5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Saturday February 2 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Saturday, February 2, 2019:#1) Wilmington Travel Basketball’s Parents Night OutWilmington Travel Basketball is holding its annual Parents Night Out from 8pm to midnight at the Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks (777 South Street). The event will feature live music by DJ Dave Glinner, plus raffles. Tickets can be purchased for $20 each or two for $30.  Contact a coach or team representative for tickets.#2) WHS Hockey & Wrestling In ActionThe WHS Girls Varsity Hockey Team hosts Melrose High at noon at Ristuccia, while the WHS Boys Varsity Hockey Team hosts Melrose High at 2pm at Ristutcica. The WHS Varsity Wrestling Team battles multiple schools at a meet at 10am at Reading High.#3) Shawsheen Tech Learn To Swim RegistrationShawsheen Tech will be holding registration for their upcoming Winter Learn to Swim Program. Walk-in sign-ups will be held at the Shawsheen Tech Pool on Saturday, February 2 and Saturday, February 9, from 9:30am-12:30pm, in the pool hallway. The registration form with additional information can be found HERE. Have a question? Contact Aquatics Director at jtildsley@shawtech.org.#4) Book Store Next Door OpenThe Friends of the Wilmington Memorial Library’s Book Store Next Door (183 Middlesex Avenue) is open from 10am to 4pm. All books are $2 or less!  Every penny of every sale benefits the Wilmington Memorial Library. Learn more HERE.#5) Wilmington Food Pantry OpenThe Wilmington Food Pantry (142 Chestnut Street) is open from 10am to noon for food donation drop-offs. Learn which food items the Pantry is most in need of HERE.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, August 19, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, June 6, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Wednesday, January 9, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Volkswagen recalls 662000 Atlas Passat vehicles for illegally adjustable headlights

first_img The 2019 Volkswagen Atlas is spacious and affordable Share your voice 20 Photos Now playing: Watch this: More From Roadshow Recalls Volkswagen More about 2018 Volkswagen Atlas Review • 2018 Volkswagen Atlas: Checking all but one box Preview • 2018 Volkswagen Atlas: New 3-row SUV lets VW play with giants Enlarge ImageIf you’re not poking around behind your headlights, you’ll probably never even notice the adjuster’s missing cap. Volkswagen Every vehicle sold in the US must conform to a massive amount of regulations known as the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. If an even seemingly insignificant FMVSS violation makes it to market, it’s all but guaranteed that a recall will follow. That’s the reason behind VW’s latest recall, which is a big one.Volkswagen has issued a recall for 662,185 examples of the 2018-2019 VW Atlas SUV and the 2012-2020 VW Passat sedan. There are a lot of cars in this recall, carrying a wide variety of build dates and non-sequential VIN ranges, so it’s best to give your dealership a ring if you think your vehicle might be part of this.The problem stems from a single cap. When it’s still being assembled, factory workers align the headlights’ horizontal aim, and then that aim adjuster is sealed off with a cap. However, the vehicles included in this recall never had that cap installed, allowing Average Joes and Janes to adjust the headlights horizontally. This puts the vehicle in violation of FMVSS 108, which states that headlights are not allowed to be adjusted horizontally after assembly. Since it’s out of spec according to federal regulations, VW initiated a recall to remedy the issue.VW discovered the problem in early 2019, when the automaker discovered missing instructions about installing the horizontal-aim adjustment cap. VW remedied this by correcting the work instructions, and then it went about figuring out how many vehicles had these missing caps. If a person changes their headlights’ horizontal aim, it may not provide adequate coverage as expected, which could present a safety hazard.Volkswagen is still researching a permanent remedy, but the idea behind it is simple: Dealership technicians will block the horizontal aim adjuster, preventing owners from making changes after the vehicle has been sold. Dealers have already been notified of the recall and affected owners should start to receive notifications in the mail later in July. 2018 Subaru Crosstrek: Just as good as before, only bettercenter_img 5 things you need to know about the 2018 Volkswagen Atlas 2018 Ford EcoSport: Better late than never 5 Tags 2020 Toyota Supra review: A solid sports car that’s rife with controversy Car Industry SUVs Sedans 1:26 Comments Volkswagenlast_img read more

AP Interview Top US Catholic Bishop Plans For Trump Meeting

first_img Share AP Photo/ John L. MoneIn this March 30, 2017 image taken from video, Cardinal Daniel Dinardo of the Archdiocese of the Houston-Galveston, speaks during an interview in Houston. The top Roman Catholic bishop in the U.S. lauds President Donald Trump for his anti-abortion views, for comments on the importance of Catholic schools and for promising to defend religious liberties.The top Roman Catholic bishop in the U.S. lauds President Donald Trump for his anti-abortion views, for comments on the importance of Catholic schools and for promising to defend religious liberties. When it comes to refugees and immigration, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo says he and Trump will “have to agree to disagree.”In a wide-ranging interview with The Associated Press, DiNardo, the archbishop for Galveston-Houston and president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, expressed concerns about Trump’s now court-stalled executive order blocking immigration from six Muslim-majority nations and about the effects the Trump administration’s immigration policies could have on families.“We have kids in our Catholic schools that are crying during the day,” DiNardo said. “They’re not sure whether their mommy or daddy is going to be home at night when they get back from school. … There’s no reason why that has to happen.”DiNardo in 2007 became the first Catholic cardinal in the Southern United States, an area where Catholicism has flourished as more people have moved there, from both inside and outside the U.S. In his first extended interview since his more than 400 fellow bishops in November elected him to a three-year term as president of the U.S. bishops’ conference, DiNardo said the conference has had “quiet initial talks” with the White House to arrange a session between him and Trump.The White House had no comment Wednesday on prospects for a meeting, although such a session would continue a common practice for the head of the bishops’ conference to confer with the U.S. president.“Right now seems to me the administration is still too early,” DiNardo said, but offered no timetable on when would be reasonable for him to speak with Trump. “They’re still working on getting their act together. It’s a massive thing to do to take over a federal administration.”Trump has taken a firm stance on immigration, passing executive orders to tighten border security and restrict refugees and travelers from certain countries. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly has credited Trump’s policies and widely publicized arrests of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally for a huge drop in the number of people caught by agents on the U.S.-Mexico border.The bishops’ conference needs to be critical of presidential administrations at times, DiNardo said, adding that it’s essential the bishops remain engaged. He pointed to the conference’s statement critical of Trump’s travel ban.“We’re willing to register that and state that,” he said. “But we always want to be able to work with every administration.”DiNardo, 67, who came to Houston in 2004 as archbishop after more than six years as bishop in Sioux City, Iowa, believes most immigrants and refugees come to the U.S. for economic reasons or to flee violence in their home countries. While he agrees with the Trump administration’s stance that criminals should be deported, he doesn’t want to see immigrant families separated.Churches have been relying on a 2011 Immigration and Customs Enforcement directive telling agents to generally avoid “sensitive areas” such as churches, hospitals and schools when conducting deportation actions. Immigration officials said that policy is still in effect, but recent immigration arrests around the U.S., including inside courthouses, are increasing fears.DiNardo says that if immigrations agents were to show up at a church, he would advise priests to consult with legal experts at Catholic Charities.DiNardo believes the rhetoric in the U.S. on hot-button issues including immigration and abortion is too heated.“You’d like to lower the temperature so people will speak to each other too,” he said. “I think that’s a dimension that religious congregations and religious people and I think even religious leadership can bring to the debate.“You don’t have to lose your prophetic stance to clearly state that something’s wrong. If I’m a pro-life person, I respect all persons even when I vigorously disagree. I do not want to end up with name calling.”On other matters, DiNardo has denounced the use of internationally banned chemicals for attacks against Syrians as morally reprehensible and sided with Pope Francis’ call for peace in Syria “through dialogue and reconciliation.” The bishops’ conference favors a political solution to the Syrian civil war with the U.S. working with other governments.He has decried the Palm Sunday bombings by Islamic State suicide bombers that killed at least 45 people in two Egyptian Christian churches as “unspeakable persecution.”In his interview with the AP, he described the state of the Catholic Church in the United States as “good” while acknowledging struggles to attract people who aren’t religious.“Part of it depends on some levels on what part of the country you’re in now,” he said. “In the South and Southwest, we are booming. I’ve dedicated 26 new church buildings in the last 12 years.”In the North and Northeast, meanwhile, the church is consolidating parishes.While churches will be full on Easter, a paltry 22 percent of the nearly 70 million U.S. Catholics regularly attended weekly Mass in 2016, according to a Georgetown University survey.“It is troubling,” DiNardo said. “One of our goals in our priority plans is in fact evangelization, by first starting with us in the church.”last_img read more

DC Homicide Count On Pace with 2016

first_imgAs of March 16, Washington, D.C.’s homicide count stood at 21 for the year, just one shy of last year’s 22 deaths in the same span. A recent burst of violence in Southeast D.C. added to the city’s battle with crime. Two men were killed over the weekend of March 10 and 11 in separate incidents.Crime Scene – Graphic: APSoutheast resident Tyrone Johnson, 24, was fatally shot in the 2300 block of Pennsylvania Avenue SE on the morning of March 10, according to the Metropolitan Police Department. Officials received a call for a shooting in an alley near The Grays on Pennsylvania Apartments. Police found Johnson lying on the ground unconscious and suffering from multiple gunshot wounds. Johnson was taken to a local hospital, where he later died. Another Southeast man, 51-year-old Dennis Lee Wise, was fatally stabbed on March 11 at approximately 2:17 a.m. in the 1800 block of Bruce Place, SE, according to police. Police said Wise was found inside a residence lying face down on a bed unconscious. He had been stabbed after an argument turned physical, and died at the scene.MPD spokesperson Karimah Bilal said information regarding the suspects involved in the weekend slayings is currently unavailable. “As always we ask the public for their assistance,” she said. The department is offering up to $25,000 for information that leads to the successful closing of a homicide case.Overall crime in D.C. is up four percent, according to police. Thefts lead the increase; a total of 2,712 thefts have been reported this year, a 15 percent jump from 2,368 occurrences during the same time a year ago.last_img read more