Volunteer Fire Chief Resigns After Labeling Steelers Tomlin With

Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin talks on his headset during the first half of an NFL football game against the Chicago Bears, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)PITTSBURGH (AP) — A Pittsburgh-area volunteer fire chief has lost his post after using a racial slur to describe Steelers coach Mike Tomlin.Paul Smith of the Muse fire company in Cecil Township wrote on Facebook that he added Tomlin to a list of “no-good” people he describes with the slur. Smith says he was upset that Tomlin had instructed his team to stay in a stadium tunnel instead of standing on the field for the national anthem ahead of Sunday’s game against the Chicago Bears.The Cecil Township Board of Supervisors says on its website Tuesday that Smith “is no longer the volunteer fire chief.”The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports (http://bit.ly/2hujHlO ) Smith resigned. He tells the newspaper he’s “not the racist the media portrays me as.”He adds he “posted in anger.” read more

Callenders Names Six New Associates Broad Range of Specialty Practice Areas

first_img Related Items:6 new associates at Callenders 0& Co. Counsel & Attorneys, Adrian Gibson. Crispin S. Hall. and Pearline Y. Ingraham joins the Freeport firm of Callenders, Syneisha Bootle. Garth Philippe and Marissa Pyfrom has joined the Nassau offices of Callenders & Co. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppCallenders & Co. Counsel & Attorneys announced today six new associates have joined the firm with offices in the heart of Nassau, western New Providence and Freeport.  “Callenders, the country’s oldest legal practice, was founded in 1903 and celebrated continuous service to local and international clients for more than 100 years over a decade ago. During all that time and for the next decade and more, there was a member of the Callender family at the helm.  Sadly, Mr. Colin Callender passed away in December, for the first time leaving Callenders without a member of the founding family in either Freeport or Nassau.  Although Mr. Callender’s death was untimely, he and the firm’s partners had been seriously recruiting the brightest and best new talent, an exercise that resulted in identifying a number of well-educated, high energy, thoughtful and diligent younger legal minds,” said Chad Roberts, Managing Partner, Nassau.  “We are now pleased to announce that six associates have proved themselves and have been named to the firm, each bringing a singular strength in a current area of demand among our client base.”Attorneys Adrian Gibson, Crispin S. Hall and Pearline Y. Ingraham joined the Freeport firm headed by Fred Smith, QC, though Gibson works out of the Nassau office.  Syneisha Bootle, Garth Philippe and Marissa Pyfrom have joined the Nassau office.  According to Mr. Roberts, it was the first time in the history of the firm that nearly every new associate had received at least part of his or her pre-law or legal education in The Bahamas, either at The College of The Bahamas or at the Eugene Dupuch Law School or a combination of the two.In Nassau, Syneisha Bootle who spent six summers interning at Callenders, returned with degrees from Keele University, (LLB), Staffordshire and Northumbria, both in the U.K.  She holds a Masters in Marine Insurance, and is an Accredited Mediator at a time when The Bahamas is moving toward becoming a neutral centre for mediation worldwide.  Marissa Pyfrom specializes in Probate, Estate Planning and Real Estate and quickly earned a reputation for accomplishment after resolving a contentious probate matter in months that had been pending for years, bringing together parties who had previously refused to negotiate or cooperate.  Rounding out the new Nassau offices associates is multilingual Garth Philippe, who studied law in Spain, France and The Bahamas and is a former advisor to the United Nations, is a member of the New York Bar and the Bahamas Bar.  He holds a graduate level Diplome de Relations Internationales in Public International Law, worked with a tri-state (New York) private lending firm and has negotiated numerous contracts with Chinese companies based in Hong Kong and mainland China.  Philippe speaks fluent French and Spanish and is conversant in Mandarin and Dutch.Adrian Gibson, assigned to the Nassau office, has been dubbed the firm’s youngest Renaissance man – lawyer, educator, journalist and mass communications specialist. Gibson pens the popular Tribune column, A Young Man’s View, spent 10 years teaching in government schools and his alma mater, College of The Bahamas, before earning his law degree, maintains a schedule of symposium and presentation speaking engagements and appearances and has been called on in a number of high profile legal matters in civil and commercial litigation including judicial reviews. Crispin S. Hall was selected to represent The Bahamas twice at mooting competitions and though trained in corporate law, maritime and civil litigation while serving in the Nassau office, he elected to take a post in Freeport to follow his passions – environmental law, human rights, employment, immigration and judicial reviews as well as contract litigation.  Like Hall, Pearline Ingraham was drawn to the Grand Bahama office of Callenders for its strong stance in human rights, civil litigation and the firm’s overall strength in insolvencies.  She has been a member of the Bar of England and Wales and the Bahamas Bar for more than a decade and continues to practice civil litigation, commercial law, conveyancing and real property and condominium disputes.“As the laws of The Bahamas continue to evolve, so must the country’s legal firms and this exhaustive exercise on the part of Callenders & Co. in Grand Bahama and in Nassau is an indication that despite our awards and recognition, no firm can stand on yesterday’s laurels,” said Fred Smith, QC, Senior Partner, Callenders, Grand Bahama office. “I am particularly pleased to know that some of the most capable young lawyers want to join Callenders because of our commitment, especially in Grand Bahama, to fighting for human rights and environmental protection and preservation.”last_img read more

San Diego County Regional Airport authority announces funding pact with airlines for

first_imgSan Diego County Regional Airport authority announces funding pact with airlines for transit projects Posted: July 2, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, July 2, 2019 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The San Diego County Regional Airport Authority announced a 10-year agreement with its airline partners Tuesday to improve transportation access to San Diego International Airport and potentially pave the way for a Metropolitan Transit System trolley route to the airport.The investment pact, totaling more than a half-billion dollars, could eventually fund multiple infrastructure projects to increase transit connections between the city of San Diego and the airport. The agreement includes funding from both the Airport Authority and its associated airlines that serve the San Diego International Airport.The projects, which are not yet approved, could include a multi-modal access road between the city and the airport, which would reduce traffic on Harbor Drive by roughly 45,000 vehicles each day. Harbor Drive is currently the main connection between the city and the airport.The Airport Authority continues to work with the city, MTS, San Diego Association of Governments, Port of San Diego, Caltrans and the North County Transit District to draft potential transit connections. According to the Airport Authority, the reduced congestion on Harbor Drive could allow for the addition of MTS Rapid bus and trolley lines along the street.“This agreement ensures that the Airport Authority will have the means to effectively partner with other regional agencies to improve access to the airport through transportation and transit projects,” said Airport Authority Board Chair April Boling.The agreement includes $350 million to on- and off-airport transit projects that will be completed collaboratively with the Airport Authority’s partner agencies and $165 million for the planned multi-modal corridor. The agreement does not include additional funding for transportation projects from local agencies like SANDAG.According to Boling, the agreement could also support projects in the Airport Development Plan like shuttle service from the Old Town Transit Center, a walking and biking path along Harbor Drive and new amenities at Terminal 1 such as bus shelters and information kiosks. All off-airport projects will require approval by the Federal Aviation Administration.“The airport and the airlines provide significant economic impact for the region and this is just the latest example of that commitment,” said Airport Authority President and CEO Kim Becker. “I sincerely appreciate the airlines’ willingness to participate in this agreement and pre-approve a significant investment in transportation and transit infrastructure.” KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

What is considered a normal resting heart rate

first_img Share your voice The first 3D-printed heart made up of living human cells 0 So your resting heart rate is normal — now what? Congrats! A normal RHR reading is definitely a good thing, but if you’re monitoring it for fitness or wellness-related reasons, it’s not the only thing to pay attention to. That’s because “normal” doesn’t necessarily equal “healthy.”  In fact, in a recent study, middle-aged men who had a RHR of 75 bpm or higher at the start of the study were twice as likely to die over the next 11 years, compared to men with a RHR of 55 or below.  “Ideally, you want your resting heart rate to be somewhere between 50 and 70 bpm,” says Haythe. “But I don’t think that people need to be obsessively checking.” Once a month is totally fine. “Something also very important is how quickly your heart rate comes down after you exercise,” Haythe said. “We want to see that your heart rate is slow at rest, that it increases appropriately with exercise, and that it comes down quickly after aerobic activity — within a few minutes.”  Regardless of which method you use, when trying to gauge how healthy you are, one thing is certain: Any results should be considered alongside other metrics, like blood pressure and cholesterol, in consultation with your doctor, especially if you notice changes over time.The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives. 1:28 If you’re not particularly fit and your RHR is consistently below 60 beats per minute, you may have bradycardia, which can be accompanied by lightheadedness, dizziness, or chest discomfort.  “A slow heart rate can likewise mean many different things,” says Haythe. “It could be completely normal, a sign of excellent physical fitness, or it could signify a heart problem. If your resting heart rate is significantly below 60 and you don’t feel well, you should go to the doctor and get an EKG.” Read more: How to get the most out of the Apple Watch heart rate features Factors that affect resting heart rate When measuring your RHR, keep in mind that there are a number of things that can affect your reading, including: Age: RHR can decrease with age, according to some studies.Gender: On average, women’s RHR tends to be two to seven beats per minute higher than men’s.Air temperature: RHR can increase during hot weather, but usually not more than 10 bpm.Emotions: Strong feelings of stress, anxiety, or even happiness can raise your RHR.Body position: RHR can be 3 bpm higher when sitting versus lying down. Similarly, RHR tends to increase a bit upon standing.Medication: Prescription drugs like antidepressants and beta blockers can cause your RHR to be higher or lower than it would if you weren’t taking the medication. Apple Watch gets FDA-cleared EKG features 9 Photos Post a comment Now playing: Watch this: Getty Images Pulse taking is an ancient technique, dating back thousands of years, but these days you’d almost never know it. Long gone are the days of placing two fingers against your neck while watching the clock. Now, measuring your resting heart rate is as easy as firing up a smartphone app or saying, “Siri, what’s my heart rate?” The ease at which you can detect your resting heart rate — and track it over time — has led to a sort of heart-rate renaissance among non-medical professionals, with everyone from health nuts to fitness fanatics trying to use it to their advantage. But the wealth of resting heart rate data available literally at your fingertips doesn’t mean anything if you don’t know how to interpret it. Below, a primer that will help get you up to speed before you next doctor’s appointment. Read more: The best iPhone and Apple Watch health devices for checking blood pressure, heart rate and more | This might be the number-one way to track your fitness What’s a normal resting heart rate? Resting heart rate (RHR) — the number of times your heart beats per minute at rest — is a quick way to gauge how efficiently your heart is working. What’s considered normal can vary widely from person to person, but in general, your RHR should fall between 60 and 100 beats per minute.  If your RHR is consistently above 100 beats per minute (a condition known as tachycardia), you should consult a doctor, especially if you’re experiencing other symptoms, such as chest tightness, fatigue or shortness of breath.  A high resting heart (ie >100 bpm) can mean many things,” says cardiologist Jennifer Haythe, MD, co-director of Columbia Women’s Heart Center. “You may be dehydrated, have a poor level of physical fitness, or it could be a sign of something more serious with your heart or lungs.” Related: Does Orangetheory Fitness work for muscle toning and weight loss? Tags Wellnesslast_img read more

Who is Lt Gen Faiz Hameed Pakistan appoints hardline general as new

first_imgLt Gen Faiz AhmedtwitterPakistan on Sunday appointed a hardliner general as new chief of the powerful Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) spy agency, replacing the agency’s current head, Lieutenant General Asim Munir, after only eight months on the job.Lieutenant General Faiz Hameed, a former senior ISI figure, was appointed director general of the agency, according to a statement by the military’s press wing, which did not explain the re-shuffle.The army is arguably the most influential institution in Pakistan, with the military having ruled the country for nearly half of its 71-year history since independence from Britain and enjoying extensive powers even under civilian administrations.By turn, the head of the ISI occupies one of the most important posts in Pakistan. The agency has long been accused of supporting Islamist militants targeting neighbour and arch-foe India as well as sheltering the Afghan Taliban and other militants.More recently, the ISI has been accused of muzzling the press, trying to skew last year’s elections, and intensifying a crackdown against human rights groups, including the Pashtun Tahaffuz Movement (PTM), an ethnic rights movement that the military accuses of being funded by neighbouring countries.Activists allege a pattern of growing authoritarianism by the military, which they say has become even more influential since Prime Minister Imran Khan swept to power last year.The military denies harbouring militants, intervening in politics or stifling dissent.The military’s backers also say Pakistan faces external threats from most of its neighbours, especially India, and is working within the law to defend the country.Hameed was seen to be hugely influential within ISI during his previous stint at the agency, according to analysts.He was one of the figures who brokered the Faizabad agreement in late 2017, when protesters blocked off roads into capital Islamabad, in an incident that further stoked civilian-military tensions.”He is very hardline,” said Ayesha Siddiqa, an analyst who has also written a book about the military’s business empire, and has been a longstanding critic.”It’s a very hawkish decision. It means the military is not backing down, and it’s going to use more force.”The military did not explain why Munir, who was posted out to lead the Gujranwala Corps, was removed as ISI chief so soon into an expected three-year term.last_img read more

Sensex down 320 points auto stocks slump

first_imgBuildings are reflected on the glass windows of the NSE (National Stock Exchange) building in Mumbai, India, December 27, 2016.Reuters fileThe Indian equity market declined on Wednesday with the S&P BSE Sensex losing over 300 points during the afternoon session.The weakness in the domestic indices came on the back of a similar trend in the Asian markets along with a sharp decline in rupee and a slowdown in the manufacturing PMI data, analysts said.Most sectoral indices traded in the negative, led by auto, metal and banking stocks. The S&P BSE auto index lost 534.70 points on weak December auto sale figures.The Nifty50 on the National Stock Exchange also declined over 100 points to trade around 10,800 points.At 1.20 p.m., the Nifty50 traded at 10,807.35, lower by 102.75 points or 0.94 per cent from the previous close of 10,910.10 points.The Sensex, which had opened at 36,198.13, traded at 35,932.66 points, lower by 321.91 points or 0.89 per cent from the previous close of 36,254.57 points.So far, it touched an intra-day high of 36,236.70 and a low of 35,866.30 points.The Indian currency slumped 45 paise on Tuesday to trade at 69.89 per dollar (around 1.20 p.m.), against the previous close of 69.45 per dollar.Also, the decline in the Nikkei Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index released during the day subdued the market sentiments. The index declined to 53.2 in December, from 54 in November.last_img read more

Trumps travel ban makes US citizens cancer treatment impossible

first_imgDonald Trump. File photoMaziar Hashemi, a naturalized US citizen who lives in Massachusetts, has been told by doctors that his best hope for surviving a rare form of blood cancer is a bone marrow transplant.President Donald Trump’s travel ban could make that impossible.Bone marrow transplants require a close match between donor and recipient. A few months after his diagnosis last September, Hashemi, 60, learned that his brother in Iran, Kamiar Hashemi, was a rare 100-per cent match. The only problem was Kamiar’s nationality.The latest travel ban, issued as a presidential proclamation and implemented on 8 December after months of legal wrangling, bars most travellers to the United States from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad and North Korea, as well as certain government officials from Venezuela. Although the ban allows for case-by-case waivers to be granted, including for medical need, Kamiar Hashemi has so far been denied a visa.Attorneys who regularly deal with visa issues say the waiver process is opaque. Visa applicants aren’t allowed to apply for waivers; they are simply granted or not without explanation. US officials won’t say how they make their decisions or how long they generally take.A US State Department official told Reuters that since the ban took effect, more than 375 waivers have been approved but he declined to say how many total visa applications have been filed from countries covered by the ban. He said he could not comment on the specifics of Hashemi’s case.Kamiar Hashemi began the visa application process soon after learning he was a match for his brother. In February, the 57-year-old small business owner travelled to Armenia to be interviewed at the US embassy there, since there is no embassy in Iran.Later on the day of the interview, Kamiar’s brother back in Massachusetts checked the status of the application on the State Department’s website. A pop-up window announced in bright blue letters: “Refused.”Waivers can later be granted to applicants initially refused for visas, according to the State Department, so Maziar Hashemi continued checking the website each day, but his brother’s status hasn’t changed. He hired an immigration lawyer, Mahsa Khanbabai, hoping she might smooth the way.Transparent as MudThe Trump administration has said travel restrictions are needed to protect the United States from terrorism.Critics have challenged the latest ban, as they did previous versions, saying that it discriminates against Muslims. Six of the eight countries included in the current ban are majority Muslim.Under the current proclamation, waivers can be granted in cases where denying entry would cause undue hardship, when the individual is found not to be a threat and when their entry is in the national interest.The proclamation lists ten examples of situations in which an applicant might be eligible for a waiver. One reason mentioned is an applicant’s need for urgent medical care, something that comes close but doesn’t exactly fit the Hashemis’ situation, since it isn’t Kamiar Hashemi, himself, in urgent need.The State Department has declined to provide details of how waiver decisions are made beyond some general answers to frequently asked questions posted on its website. But a State Department letter obtained by Reuters earlier this month said “there is no waiver form to be completed” and that applicants who fall into the categories outlined in the proclamation “must be considered” for one.“The process is as transparent as mud,” said Hashemi’s attorney Khanbabai. “There are no clear guidelines. It’s difficult to figure out what the process is and who is actually doing the processing.”Nevertheless, Khanbabai submitted a packet of information on the Hashemis’ behalf to the embassy on 19 March, including a letter from Massachusetts General Hospital explaining that a perfect match for a bone marrow transplant is very rare and could provide the only viable treatment for Maziar Hashemi’s Myelodysplastic syndrome.Worried about the ticking clock, Kamiar Hashemi looked into traveling to India to have his bone marrow harvested there and rushed to the United States, but that option was also thwarted.A non-profit organization trying to facilitate the transfer, Be The Match, said it had to pull out after its legal team concluded that Kamiar’s bone marrow couldn’t be exported to the United States because of US sanctions on Iranian exports.“Can you imagine that the cells of an Iranian needed in order to help a US citizen are embargoed?” said Maziar Hashemi, a civil engineer who has lived in the United States since the 1970s.“It is just unfair,” he said in a phone interview. “I cannot wait much longer.”last_img read more

Body Found at New Mexico Compound Believed to be Missing Black Boy

first_imgBy Stephen Groves and Morgan Lee, The Associated PressA severely disabled Georgia boy who authorities say was kidnapped by his father and marked for an exorcism was found buried at the ramshackle compound in the New Mexico desert that has been the focus of investigators for the past week, the toddler’s grandfather said Aug. 9.New Mexico authorities, however, said they had yet to identify the remains, discovered Aug. 6. And prosecutors said they were awaiting word on the cause of death before deciding on any charges.Imam Siraj Wahhaj speaks to reporters, Aug. 9, in New York. Wahhaj, the grandfather of a missing Georgia boy, says the remains of the child were found buried at a desert compound in New Mexico. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)The boy, Abdul-ghani Wahhaj, would have turned 4 Monday. Prosecutors said he was snatched from his mother in December in Jonesboro, Ga., near Atlanta.The search for him led authorities to New Mexico, where 11 hungry children and a youngster’s remains were found in recent days at a filthy compound shielded by old tires, wooden pallets and an earthen wall studded with broken glass.The missing boy’s grandfather, Siraj Wahhaj, a Muslim cleric who leads a well-known New York City mosque, told reporters he had learned from other family members that the remains were his grandson’s.The imam said he did not know the cause of death.“Whoever is responsible, then that person should be held accountable,” Wahhaj said.In an interview with WSB-TV in Atlanta, the boy’s mother also called for “justice” as she described how her life had been taken from her after her son was abducted by his father, which she said was out of character for him. She and Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, the imam’s son, had been married almost 14 years.“I wasn’t able to save my son,” she told the television station.Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, left, sits next to public defense attorney Aleks Kostich at a first appearance in New Mexico state district court in Taos, N.M., Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018, on accusations of child abuse and abducting his son from the boy’s mother. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee)Ramzi Wahhaj, who is from Morocco, filed for divorce in December — the same month neighbors say Siraj Ibn Wahhaj and others arrived in Amalia, N.M.A Georgia arrest warrant accused him of kidnapping his child. Authorities said the father at some point told his wife he wanted to perform an exorcism on the boy, who suffers seizures and requires constant attention because of a lack of oxygen and blood flow at birth.The child’s father was among five adults arrested on suspicion of child abuse in the raid at the compound. In court papers, prosecutors also said Wahhaj had been training children there to carry out school shootings.Speaking at his Brooklyn mosque, the elder Wahhaj said he had no knowledge of any such training.“It sounds to me it sounds crazy. But I don’t know,” he said. “I make no judgments yet because we don’t know.”The imam’s mosque has attracted a number of radicals over the years, including a man who later helped bomb the World Trade Center in 1993.In a video posted Thursday on Facebook, mosque spokesman Ali Abdul-Karim Judan called the case a “domestic situation” and vehemently denied it had anything to do with extremism.“None of the charges had anything to do with anybody teaching anybody shooting to commit acts of terrorism or to go in and shoot up any school,” he said. “Because it’s a Muslim and the circumstances that are surrounding their situation, they want to change the narrative.”The elder Wahhaj said all 11 of the children, ages 1 to 15, were either his biological grandchildren or members of his family through marriage.The raid of the compound came when Georgia authorities received word that children inside the compound were starving.The elder Wahhaj said the tip came to law enforcement through him. He said he was able to learn their whereabouts from a note that his daughter, one of the five adults at the site, sent to a man in Atlanta saying they were starving and asking for food.That man then notified Wahhaj, who said he decided to send food and contact police.Groves reported from New York. Associated Press writers Brinley Hineman in Atlanta and Mary Hudetz in Albuquerque, N.M., contributed to this report.last_img read more

Fujitsu Introduces First 4Channel HDMI Connector Ports

first_imgFujitsu LTD – Embedded FRAM w/4-Channel HMDI Ports This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Fujitsu Introduces First 4-Channel HDMI Connector Ports (2007, November 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-11-fujitsu-channel-hdmi-connector-ports.html In a blink of an eye Fujitsu has solved the costly problem of having to have separate memory on each of the HDMI ports. Fujitsu has produced the first embedded FRAM for digital TV that allows simultaneous use of a 4-Channel HDMI connector ports. The HDMI connector ports are used for running DVD recorders, camcorders, video gaming consoles, that store high resolution data and are read by audio visual devices when used with digital televisions. In use the new Fujitsu LSI in digital TVs allows high-speed factory programming of Expanded Display Identification display data. This breakthrough provides a cost saving in the overall production by reducing the number of the parts and reducing mounting space. In practice the evolution in HDMI, a digital multi-media interface has created high-quality video and audio output. The HDMI connector when used allows devices that create output to read the display data, like the display resolution and then automatically adjusts their output to produce the best display. The memory function for display devices which need four EPROM cells can now be handled by one cell. The key specifications are a memory capacity of 256-byte. The interface is DDC 4-Channel. The package is TSSOP 16-pin. The key savings besides parts and space is the reduced labor costs involved in the factory programming process. In turn this will potentially reduce the costs of producing digital televisions. Fujitsu is a leader in the field of IT and communication solutions headquartered in Tokyo, Japan with offices around the world. Fujitsu plans to demonstrate and show the innovation named MB85RF402 at the Embedded Technology Trade Show on November 14-17, 2007 in Yokohama, Japan. It is currently available for sample shipments and has a million unit per month sales target. Fujitsu has introduced the world´s first embedded FRAM for digital TVs that allow simultaneous use of a 4-Channel HDMI connector ports. The innovation will reduce the number of pars, mounting space and programming labor costs. It is expected to reduce the costs of digital TVs. New HDMI Chip Enables High Definition Display of Standard Definition Video Content and Digital Photos on HDTV Explore furtherlast_img read more