Warriors report: What Warriors make of Patrick McCaw saga

first_imgAfter all, McCaw had rejected … (CLICK HERE, if you are unable to view this photo gallery on your mobile device.)* * *Subscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table book* * *PORTLAND, Ore. — In about 24 hours, the Warriors will have an official response to Patrick McCaw’s two-year, $6 million offer sheet from the Cleveland Cavaliers. But the Warriors appeared to make a decision on McCaw’s future well beforehand.last_img

United faces boycott campaign over passenger’s violent removal.

first_imgUnited Airlines chief executive Oscar Munoz said the airline was investigating the incident but attracted social media fire for describing the incident as a move to “re-accommodate’’ the passenger.“This is an upsetting event to all of us here at United,’’ Munoz said. “I apologize for having to re-accommodate these customers.“Our team is moving with a sense of urgency to work with the authorities and conduct our own detailed review of what happened. We are also reaching out to this passenger to talk directly to him and further address and resolve this situation.”One of the three security officers involved incident has since been placed on leave by the Chicago Department of Aviation, which said it was carrying out a of review of the incident because it was outside its standard operating procedure.Airlines are allowed to involuntarily remove people from flights in US and overbooked flights are enough of a problem that the government has rules about how they should be offloaded.These require airlines to first seek volunteers and to pay compensation for those who are bumped involuntarily if the airline is unable to get you to your scheduled destination within an hour of your originally scheduled arrival time.Compensation rises to 200 per cent of your one-way ticket price (up to $US675) if you are bumped and between one and two hours late on a domestic flight or between one and four hours late on an international flight.It hits 400  per cent, or a maximum of $US1375, if you are bumped and more than two hours late on a replacement domestic flight or four hours internationally.US Department of Transportation figures show 40,629 airline customers were subject to involuntary denied boarding in 2016, or about 0.62 per 10,000 passengers. United had 3,765 passengers in this category but was below the industry average with 0.43 involuntary denied boardings per 10,000 passengers. United Airlines is facing an online campaign to boycott its flights amid social media outrage over an appalling video showing a man claiming to be a doctor being dragged forcibly from a plane because the airline needed his seat to reposition staff.A video showing the man being dragged down the aisle of United Express Flight 3411 from Chicago to Louisville, Kentucky on Sunday has gone viral around the world, become a hot media topic and provoked a social media backlash.READ: Not all passengers are equalThe incident is PR nightmare for the airline that billed itself as the “friendly skies’’.The airline confirmed the flight was overbooked and it had asked for volunteers to give up their seats on the flight.When this failed, media reports said, it selected four passengers who were asked to leave the plane,  three of whom did so.“After our team looked for volunteers, one customer refused to leave the aircraft voluntarily and law enforcement was asked to come to the gate,’’ the airline said.A passenger who posted footage of the event, Jayse  Anspach, tweeted: “#United overbooked and wanted four of us to volunteer to give up our seats for personnel that needed to be at work the next day.”“No one volunteered, so United decided to choose for us. They chose an Asian doctor and his wife.”“The doctor needed to work at the hospital the next day, so he refused to volunteer.“A couple (of) airport security men forcefully pulled the doctor out of his chair and to the floor of the aisle.’’Anspach said the passenger’s face was slammed against an armrest, causing serious bleeding,  as he was being dragged out and he seemed to go limp.“Ten minutes later, the doctor runs back into the plane with a bloody face, clings to a post in the back, chanting, “I need to go home.”,’’ he said.Passenger Tyler Bridges told The New York Times the airline initially offered $US400 vouchers to people prepared to voluntarily give up their seats and increased this to $US800 and $US1000 when no-one took up the offer.Passengers were told the aircraft would not leave until four people got off,  he said.last_img read more

Kapil Dev to deliver Dalmiya Lecture on November 14

first_imgIndia’s first World Cup-winning captain Kapil Dev will deliver the first Jagmohan Dalmiya Memorial Lecture here on November 14.This is going to be an annual event from now on, the Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB) stated in a release.Besides Kapil, president of Sri Lanka Cricket (SLC) Thilanga Sumathipala will also speak during the programme to be attended by both Indian and Sri Lankan team members ahead of the first Test at the Eden Gardens.The CAB will also organise felicitation of certain long serving members of the Association on that day, names of whom will be intimated in due course, it added.last_img

What is considered a normal resting heart rate

first_img Share your voice The first 3D-printed heart made up of living human cells 0 So your resting heart rate is normal — now what? Congrats! A normal RHR reading is definitely a good thing, but if you’re monitoring it for fitness or wellness-related reasons, it’s not the only thing to pay attention to. That’s because “normal” doesn’t necessarily equal “healthy.”  In fact, in a recent study, middle-aged men who had a RHR of 75 bpm or higher at the start of the study were twice as likely to die over the next 11 years, compared to men with a RHR of 55 or below.  “Ideally, you want your resting heart rate to be somewhere between 50 and 70 bpm,” says Haythe. “But I don’t think that people need to be obsessively checking.” Once a month is totally fine. “Something also very important is how quickly your heart rate comes down after you exercise,” Haythe said. “We want to see that your heart rate is slow at rest, that it increases appropriately with exercise, and that it comes down quickly after aerobic activity — within a few minutes.”  Regardless of which method you use, when trying to gauge how healthy you are, one thing is certain: Any results should be considered alongside other metrics, like blood pressure and cholesterol, in consultation with your doctor, especially if you notice changes over time.The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives. 1:28 If you’re not particularly fit and your RHR is consistently below 60 beats per minute, you may have bradycardia, which can be accompanied by lightheadedness, dizziness, or chest discomfort.  “A slow heart rate can likewise mean many different things,” says Haythe. “It could be completely normal, a sign of excellent physical fitness, or it could signify a heart problem. If your resting heart rate is significantly below 60 and you don’t feel well, you should go to the doctor and get an EKG.” Read more: How to get the most out of the Apple Watch heart rate features Factors that affect resting heart rate When measuring your RHR, keep in mind that there are a number of things that can affect your reading, including: Age: RHR can decrease with age, according to some studies.Gender: On average, women’s RHR tends to be two to seven beats per minute higher than men’s.Air temperature: RHR can increase during hot weather, but usually not more than 10 bpm.Emotions: Strong feelings of stress, anxiety, or even happiness can raise your RHR.Body position: RHR can be 3 bpm higher when sitting versus lying down. Similarly, RHR tends to increase a bit upon standing.Medication: Prescription drugs like antidepressants and beta blockers can cause your RHR to be higher or lower than it would if you weren’t taking the medication. Apple Watch gets FDA-cleared EKG features 9 Photos Post a comment Now playing: Watch this: Getty Images Pulse taking is an ancient technique, dating back thousands of years, but these days you’d almost never know it. Long gone are the days of placing two fingers against your neck while watching the clock. Now, measuring your resting heart rate is as easy as firing up a smartphone app or saying, “Siri, what’s my heart rate?” The ease at which you can detect your resting heart rate — and track it over time — has led to a sort of heart-rate renaissance among non-medical professionals, with everyone from health nuts to fitness fanatics trying to use it to their advantage. But the wealth of resting heart rate data available literally at your fingertips doesn’t mean anything if you don’t know how to interpret it. Below, a primer that will help get you up to speed before you next doctor’s appointment. Read more: The best iPhone and Apple Watch health devices for checking blood pressure, heart rate and more | This might be the number-one way to track your fitness What’s a normal resting heart rate? Resting heart rate (RHR) — the number of times your heart beats per minute at rest — is a quick way to gauge how efficiently your heart is working. What’s considered normal can vary widely from person to person, but in general, your RHR should fall between 60 and 100 beats per minute.  If your RHR is consistently above 100 beats per minute (a condition known as tachycardia), you should consult a doctor, especially if you’re experiencing other symptoms, such as chest tightness, fatigue or shortness of breath.  A high resting heart (ie >100 bpm) can mean many things,” says cardiologist Jennifer Haythe, MD, co-director of Columbia Women’s Heart Center. “You may be dehydrated, have a poor level of physical fitness, or it could be a sign of something more serious with your heart or lungs.” Related: Does Orangetheory Fitness work for muscle toning and weight loss? Tags Wellnesslast_img read more

Kate Middleton being accused of shocking behaviour towards another Royal fans disappointed

first_imgDuchess of Cambridge, and Prince William travel to Buckingham Palace in the 1902 State Landau along the Procession Route, after their wedding in Westminster Abbey, in central London April 29, 2011.ReutersKate Middleton may have rubbed Queen Letizia the wrong way, or at least that’s what Royal observers think. Reportedly Kate Middleton and Queen Letizia both attended the Order of the Garter in London. Twitter users are convinced of a rift between the Duchess of Cambridge and the wife of the King of Spain, calling Kate “rude”. But what did a body language expert make of the claims?If the twitter-sphere is in a tizzy, Kate could find herself getting some unwanted attention. The Duchess of Cambridge does seem to have her hands full with feuds at the moment. If the reports of a supposed rift between her and the Duchess of Sussex Meghan Markle are to be believed. Kate has apparently been blamed for indulging in an alleged feud between Norfolk neighbor Rose Hanbury.Reportedly social media users are suspicious of a feud between Kate and Spanish royal Queen Letizia. These users are convinced that Kate has beef with Queen Letizia as the Duchess of Cambridge put on a grumpy face and ignored Queen Letizia, while others claimed that Kate was being disrespectful. Not all of them were blaming Kate though, as some came to her rescue claiming that people are reading too much into non-issues and gestures.  Kate MiddletonGetty imagesHowever, body language expert Judi James has a few insights. James said: “A clue that all might not be as it seems in terms of any hints of slight awkwardness might come from the fact that Kate appears to dislike carriage rides because they cause her motion sickness.””Her body language reflected tension during the ride at the Trooping of the Colour and this could be a similar problem for her here,” he said.We have to say that it sounds like a more reasonable explanation than Kate Middleton randomly hating another Royal without a reason.last_img read more

4 Takeaways From The Big Primary Kickoff Night

first_imgGerry Broome/APRick Colyer votes at the Durham County Library North Regional in Durham, N.C., Tuesday. Braun’s win might mean more for how Republicans try to win in primaries the rest of this year than Blankenship’s loss.4. Democrats aren’t facing primary headwinds yet — and might not.While there have been signs of division on the Democratic side, it hasn’t manifested very strongly.Instead, the division so far has still mostly been on one side — with Republicans unhappy with Washington. There were opportunities Tuesday night for the more progressive wing of the party to flex its muscles, but it instead chose the pragmatic route.Think: the Ohio governor’s race primary, for example, where former Rep. Dennis Kucinich was trying to paint Richard Cordray, the former head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau appointed by Obama, as too much of a centrist with less progressive views on guns. But Cordray, who was endorsed by Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, trounced Kucinich by 40 points.It might be somewhat worrying for Democrats that more Republicans turned out for the open Ohio gubernatorial primary than one that got as much attention as the Cordray-Kucinich contest. And a relatively unknown progressive challenger to Manchin got 30 percent of the vote Tuesday night, which is similar to what happened in Texas two months ago when an unknown got almost a quarter of the vote against Beto O’Rourke. But those seem relatively minor, compared with the anti-Washington messages Republicans are winning with and an ousted congressman.Looking ahead over the next month, in more than a dozen states, there’s really only one Senate race where progressives are expected to mount a significant challenge to a sitting Democrat. That’s Dianne Feinstein facing off with state Sen. Kevin de León. He’s a darling of the left, but Feinstein’s team is confident, and polls have shown her with a comfortable lead so far. There’s also the May 22 runoff for the 7th Congressional District in Texas, featuring Lizzie Pannill Fletcher against Laura Moser.The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee tried to muscle Moser out of the race, because it felt she was too liberal for the district. It’s a key race, because Hillary Clinton got more votes than Trump in the district yet it is represented by a Republican, Rep. John Culberson.But that’s it. The lack of challenges to Democrats, especially senators, means they’re able to preserve their resources to fight in the general election. The real Democratic fight that’s coming is likely in 2020 with a crowded presidential primary field and a race to the left shaping up.But, right now, there’s nothing more unifying for Democrats than Trump.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Share In Indiana, Mike Braun, who runs a warehousing and shipping company, won the GOP Senate primary. He will take on another top GOP Senate target in a state Trump won — Joe Donnelly. Braun did it with a conservative outsider businessman message (heard that one before?), defeating two Republican congressmen. He ran a brutal ad that painted Reps. Todd Rokita and Luke Messer as cardboard cutouts indistinguishable from each other.center_img Midterms, especially primaries, are won and lost by activists.And right now, if Tuesday night’s primary results are any indication, Democrats appear to be in better shape structurally than the GOP. It’s still very early in primary season to draw conclusions that are too sweeping, but here are four takeaways based on what’s known from Tuesday night’s elections in Ohio, Indiana, West Virginia and North Carolina:1. Republicans dodge a bullet. Are they learning the lesson of Alabama?Washington Republicans were holding their breath, hoping that Don Blankenship would not win the Republican Senate primary in West Virginia. Blankenship served a year in prison after 29 people were killed when one of his mines exploded and he was convicted of conspiring to undermine mine-safety regulations. Washington Republicans believed that if he won, he would lose to Democratic incumbent Sen. Joe Manchin. And Manchin should be a top GOP target in a state Trump won by one of the widest margins of any state in the country in the 2016 presidential election.Blankenship had been showing remarkable and surprising strength in the race with an anti-Washington message. He went after Republican Senate Leader Mitch McConnell and said he was “Trumpier than Trump” after Trump tweeted urging West Virginia Republicans not to vote for him. Despite internal polling released by his opponents’ campaigns showing Blankenship in the lead, he wound up finishing third. State Attorney General Patrick Morrisey won with a little more than a third of the vote.Pragmatic Republicans are exhaling Wednesday morning and hoping that the base of the party is heeding Trump’s call to “Remember Alabama” and learning that nominating fatally flawed candidates who would have trouble winning in a general election is a bad idea.Republicans over the past decade have lost roughly half a dozen Senate seats because of problematic candidates. That’s something McConnell and his team have been throwing their hands up about for years.McConnell’s team was loving this West Virginia result, though.Thanks for playing, @DonBlankenship. #WVSen pic.twitter.com/TV1ETgQdmu— Team Mitch (@Team_Mitch) May 9, 20182. McConnell isn’t entirely off the hook. Despite his team’s gloating, the Republican Senate leader has become problematic for the party in some circles.He remains the most unpopular senator in the country. And just 30 percent of even people in his home state of Kentucky approve of the job he is doing.Highlighting that point, in congratulating Morrisey, Senate Conservatives Fund President Ken Cuccinelli wrote of McConnell:“It’s important to note that Senator Mitch McConnell put this seat at greater risk by giving an unattractive candidate like Don Blankenship an even more unpopular foil to run against. McConnell has become so toxic with Republican primary voters that his support is often the kiss of death and his opposition is a powerful endorsement.”3. Republican voters continue to reject Washington.To that point, there was ample evidence Tuesday night that there is quite a bit of angst in the GOP base toward Washington Republicans:In North Carolina, the first sitting congressional representative this year lost a primary challenge — Rep. Robert Pittenger in North Carolina’s 9th Congressional District. Mark Harris, who lost to Pittenger in 2016 by 2 points, won in a rematch this time around. This seat, which leans Republican — Trump and Romney won it by 12 points — could now be competitive. The Democrat in the race, Dan McCready, had raised more money than Pittenger and has far more cash on hand than Harris, $1.2 million versus $71,000. As the Charlotte Observer notes, McCready is “one of nine Democratic challengers with a six-figure fundraising advantage over a GOP incumbent, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Only one Democratic challenger in the country had more cash on hand at the end of the 1st quarter.” And Democrats also showed up in droves in Tuesday’s primary, far outpacing the GOP turnout.In West Virginia, Rep. Evan Jenkins, who was the early favorite in the race and looks the Washington congressman part, finished second. Instead, the winner was the state attorney general, Patrick Morrisey, who ran as an “outsider” (despite his lobbyist past) and gained attention for an ad that uprooted a West Virginia mountain and dropped it on the U.S. Capitol. I’m running for U.S. Senate not to just change Washington, but to blow it up and reinvent it. Washington is fundamentally broken. We can fix that with a West Virginia conservative fighter! #wvsen pic.twitter.com/hogbOoYnms— AG Patrick Morrisey (@MorriseyWV) April 5, 2018last_img read more