Quebec director Denis Villeneuve selected as a juror at Cannes Film Festival

first_imgCANNES, France — Quebec director Denis Villeneuve has been chosen as one of the nine jurors who will select the highest prize at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.Australian actress and producer Cate Blanchett will head the jury for the Palme d’Or.The other members are American actress Kristen Stewart, French actress Lea Seydoux, French director Robert Guediguian, Chinese actor Chang Chen, American scriptwriter Ava DuVernay, Burundian singer Khadja Nin and Russian director Andrei Zviaguintsev.? OMG !!! Le jury de #Cannes2018, présidé par Cate Blanchett, est complètement dingue ! On y retrouve Léa Seydoux, Kristen Stewart, Denis Villeneuve, Robert Guédiguian, Ava Duvernay, Khadja Nin, Chang Chen et Andrey Zvyagintsev. pic.twitter.com/KpGZKz8GeE— Mehdi Omaïs (@MehdiOmais) April 18, 2018 Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisementcenter_img Facebook Advertisement Director Denis Villeneuve, Emily Blunt and Benicio del Toro pose for photographers upon arrival for the screening of the film Sicario at the 68th international film festival, Cannes, southern France, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Thibault Camus Villeneuve’s first feature-length film, “Un 32 aout sur Terre (“August 32nd on Earth”) was invited to Cannes in 1998. “Next Floor” in 2008, “Polytechnique” in 2009 and “Sicario” in 2015 were also presented at the festival.The 71st edition of the festival begins May 8.last_img read more

After Mueller questions loom about 2020 election security

ATLANTA — With the end of the special counsel’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 race for the White House, election security experts are wondering whether the U.S. is doing enough to fend off an attack in 2020.The special counsel’s probe ended last week with the conclusion there was no co-ordination with the Trump campaign.But the 22-month-long investigation underscored how vulnerable the U.S. was to a foreign adversary seeking to sow discord, spread misinformation and exploit security gaps in state election systems.What happened in 2016 has trigged a wide range of actions by social media companies and federal, state and local officials.But security experts and elected officials wonder whether the federal government and the states have done what they need to do to thwart another attack by Russia or other hostile foreign actors.Christina A. Cassidy, The Associated Press read more

Labor Department proposal would make millions more eligible for overtime

Labor Department proposal would make millions more eligible for overtime AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by Christopher S. Rugaber And Josh Lederman, The Associated Press Posted Jun 29, 2015 6:49 pm MDT WASHINGTON – The Obama administration will propose requiring overtime pay for workers who earn nearly $1,000 per week, three individuals familiar with the plan said Monday, more than doubling the current threshold and extending overtime protection to about 5 million workers.Currently, salaried employees who are paid more than $455 a week — or $23,660 a year — can be exempted from overtime pay if their employer deems them to be “managers,” even if they have little in the way of supervisory duties. The Labor Department’s long-awaited proposal will raise the threshold to $970 a week — $50,440 a year — by 2016.To keep up with future inflation and wage growth, the proposal will peg the salary threshold at the 40th percentile of income, said the individuals, who requested anonymity to discuss the proposal ahead of the official announcement.President Barack Obama was to announce the proposal Tuesday morning in an op-ed in The Huffington Post, said one of the individuals. The White House declined to comment.The Labor Department’s estimates suggest the proposal would raise wages for 5 million people, but other estimates are far higher. The Economic Policy Institute, a liberal think-tank , recently estimated that a threshold of $984 a week would cover 15 million people.“This is by definition middle-class people. This reverses decades of neglect,” said EPI President Larry Mishel, adding that the proposal would also likely create jobs for hourly workers.___Associated Press writer Jim Kuhnhenn contributed to this report. read more

Maldives should repeal new regulation providing for death penalty says UN rights

“We urge the Government to retain its moratorium on the use of the death penalty in all circumstances, particularly in cases that involve juvenile offenders and to work towards abolishing the practice altogether,” said Ravina Shamdasani, spokesperson for the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).“We equally encourage the Government to repeal the new regulations and other provisions that provide for the death penalty,” she told reporters in Geneva.Adopted on 27 April, the new regulation provides for the use of the death penalty for the offence of intentional murder, including when committed by individuals under the age of 18. The age of criminal responsibility in the Maldives is 10, but for hadd offences, children as young as 7 years old can be held responsible. Haddoffences include theft, fornication, adultery, consumption of alcohol, and apostasy.Ms. Shamdasani noted that the new regulation means that children as young as 7 can now be sentenced to death. “According to the new regulation, minors convicted of intentional murder shall be executed once they turn 18. Similar provisions in the recently ratified Penal Code, allowing for the application of the death penalty for crimes committed when below the age of 18, are also deeply regrettable,” she said. Under international law, those who are charged and convicted for offences they have committed while they were under 18 years of age should not be sentenced to death or life imprisonment without possibility of release, the spokesperson added.Further, international human rights treaties, particularly the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which Maldives has ratified, impose an absolute ban on the death sentence against persons below the age of 18 at the time when the offence was committed. read more

Warriors Thompson expected to play Game 4 vs Raptors Durant still out

BROWSE toronto raptors Related Stories Where to watch Raptors vs. Warriors NBA finalsWarriors investor fined, banned from NBA for shoving Raptor Kyle L…Raptors run provides a golden opportunity for long-term economic b… The Golden State Warriors will get one of their two injured stars back for Game 4 of the NBA Finals against the Toronto Raptors on Friday.Warriors coach Steve Kerr says guard Klay Thompson will play after missing Wednesday’s Game 3 loss with a hamstring injury suffered Sunday in Toronto.However, Kerr says forward Kevin Durant will remain out. Durant hasn’t played since May 8.Kerr says he hopes Durant can make it back during the series. He was originally hoping Durant would get on the floor to work with teammates today, but that did not occur.The Raptors lead the best-of-seven series 2-1 after a 123-109 win in Game 3.Game 5 of the series is next Monday in Toronto. read more

Prep schools fail to fill free places for poor children because they cant

first_imgLeaden Hall Prep School in Salisbury (stock picture)Credit:Philip Hollis Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Leaden Hall Prep School in Salisbury (stock picture) In September Prime Minister Theresa May warned Britain’s independent schools are “divorced from normal life” and said they must do more to help children from poorer backgrounds or face losing their status as charities.She was accused of “waging war” on private schools by announcing a series of new policy measures which threatened them with punishment unless they complied.However, prep schools have claimed that poor parents are being put off by negative stereotypes of private schools that portrayed them as elitist and quirky.A survey of 200 prep school heads was conducted by Attain, the magazine of the Independent Association of Prep Schools, to seek their views on Mrs May’s plans. Of these, 125 said their schools did offer full bursaries.However, 9.6 per cent of head teachers said they had “no interest” from parents and had not offered any full bursary places in the past year, and 39.2 per cent said there was “not enough interest” and their schools rarely got enough suitable candidates.Another 28.8 per cent said there was “sufficient interest” and they usually allocated all their free places while only 22.4 per cent said they had “lots of interest” and demand outstrips supply.In contrast, 80 per cent of prep school heads said they were able to allocate part-funded bursaries for families who can afford to pay a proportion of the fees but not the full amount. Average fees are £13,623 a year for day pupils and £30,951 for boarding.Private schools offered 39,825 means-tested places to families who could not afford full fees last year, 7.7 per cent of all pupils at independent schools, with an average reduction of £8,370.Earlier this month it emerged independent schools will tell the government they are prepared to offer 10,000 free places to children from low-income backgrounds. The Independent Schools Council (ISC) said private schools in England will cover the costs each year if the Government gives them the £5,550 per pupil the state system allocates for each child.David Hanson, chief executive of the Independent Association of Prep Schools, said: “The media characterisation of private schools is so extreme and embedded through constant repetition that for ordinary people what they represent is not only unattainable, but also incomprehensible and alien.”I welcome the opportunity we have now to bust those myths.”Ryan Shorthouse, director of the progressive Tory think tank Bright Blue, said: “It is irksome to see some of these prestigious and well-resourced institutions now complain that the government is asking them to do activities — sponsor a state school, or offer fully funded bursaries —which they allege they are unable to do.”They should try harder in making sure they can meet these reasonable requests, or start suggesting reasonable alternatives.” Free private school places set aside for children from low-income backgrounds are going unfilled because heads cannot find eligible families to take them, it emerged today.Researchers found almost half of independent prep schools said they did not get enough applicants for fully funded bursaries.One in ten said they had not offered a single free place in the past year.It comes as private schools face a threat to their charitable status, which the ISC says saves such establishments £150 million per year.last_img read more

AE doctors at Skeldon Hospital stage sitin over drug shortages

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedSkeldon Hospital sit-in: RHO blames miscommunication for drug shortageApril 10, 2018In “Health”WCD health centres facing drug shortages – sourceJanuary 4, 2019In “latest news”Doctors, nurses stage sit-in over deplorable state of Diamond hospitalSeptember 6, 2017In “latest news” In light of there being reports of drug shortages at the Skeldon Hospital in Region Six, physicians attached to the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department of the health facility on Monday staged a “sit in” and refused to see patients.According to the medical practitioners- most of whom are attached to the A&E Unit of the health facility- it would prove to be useless to even attempt to carry out their duties as the hospital has no medication, gloves or other basic medical supplies.A limping patient, Rajindra Shivnarine of Number 75 Village, Berbice, who was denied the hospital’s service and told this online publication that he was told to come back another time.Furthermore, Executive member of the Guyana Public Service Union (GPSU), Ram Mangru visited the location after he learnt of the sit-in.However, he noted while the staff of the hospital have shown their willingness to continue protesting until solutions are met, the GPSU, he said, could not advise them on a way forward unless it holds discussions with Regional Officials.Meanwhile, the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) Permanent Secretary, Collette Adams and other Ministry officials say they “are mystified by Monday’s industrial action by the Skeldon Hospital physicians” since according to Adams, “the hospital received supplies from the Materials Management Unit (MMU) last Thursday.”“She said further, no hospital authority or the doctors complained to the Ministry or the Union about shortage of supplies at the A&E,” a press statement from the Ministry explained.The ‘sit-in’ didn’t disrupt operations in other parts of the hospital according to Alex Foster, the point person for the Public Health Ministry in Region Six.Foster said A&E physicians were upset that critical supplies were unavailable to treat their patients forcing them to take industrial action.Nevertheless, it was disclosed that a high-level meeting is planned for tomorrow (Tuesday) following today’s strike action.Furthermore, the MOPH release noted that “medical supplies are expected to be transported to the Skeldon Hospital on Tuesday morning.” read more

Callinan Informants are difficult to handle

first_imgGARDA INFORMANTS ARE expressly forbidden to take part in any criminal activity, the Garda Commissioner has told the Oireachtas Public Accounts Committee.Martin Callinan told the committee that the Covert Human Intelligence Source (CHIS) system, the process by which the gardaí handle informants, is very clear what the requirements are in relation to handling of informants“It has to be said at the outset that these people are extremely difficult people to handle,” he said. “To have a very effective informant they have to be quite close to the bone so our agent handlers who are all trained in these matters have to walk a very fine line.”However, he said that rules of engagement are there and “they are very clear”. Informants are told at the outset that under no circumstances can they get involved with criminality – “that is a given”, said Callinan. Also, the force does not use ‘participating’ informants in this country.“I would expect that if a situation arises or develops where we did need to introduce an element of participation, it would be a matter of deferring to the Director of Public Prosecutions,” said the commissioner.An Garda Síochána does not give carte blanche to anyone to commit crime, he continued.ConcernsLast week, the Minister for Justice Alan Shatter expressed his concerns about that gardaí delayed its investigation into alleged collusion by members of the force with a known drug dealer.The Garda Ombudsman (GSOC) said it took four years to complete a probe into the accusations that members of the force colluded with Louth convict-turned-informant Kieran Boylan due to difficulties in obtaining evidence from gardaí.Callinan said he is absolutely subscribed to the view that the GSOC as a statutory body is fully entitled to see all of the information that the gardaí have available to them.He said that the gardaí have for quite some time now been engaged with the GSOC in the context of how they would safely pass on that type of information and how that information would be handled in the context of the ombudsman’s legal obligations.He said that in the course of the above investigation, 140 volumes of material were passed over to the ombudsman in addition to over 2000 documents, which in his view “shows a level of cooperation that is very substantial”.Deputy Shane Ross questioned if the gardaí are adhering to their own guidelines, and was told by Callinan that they have very clear guidelines and rules in relation to informants, and that GSOC is entitled to come in and investigate any cases where they believe there is a breach of those guidelines.Ross suggested the gardaí are not accountable in certain ways, but Callinan said they are fully accountable.Read: Gardaí ‘delayed’ giving evidence in informant collusion probe>last_img read more

Valve should let someone else make a Steam Box console

first_imgWe know that Steam for Linux is right around the corner, and that the first game to be released for the platform (Left 4 Dead 2) was achieving frame rates of over 300fps long before final builds were being talked about. We also know that Steam is shopping around for some talent with regards to hardware development. Now, with Steam’s new Big Picture mode, everything is in place for someone to create a dedicated console to plug in to your television and play Steam games.Personally, I find that idea very exciting, and I hope that we don’t have to wait too long before something like the often rumored Steam Box console comes to market. I just hope Valve isn’t the one to make it.Big Picture is a cool idea, but it lacks some kind of finality. Most people I know have media centers connected to their televisions, but few of them have the hardware in them to run games. Serious PC gamers aren’t going to be rushing out to the living room with their machines. Even if they were comfortable using a gamepad like the Big Picture video suggests, there’s not many hardcore PC gamers willing to relocate to the living room yet, and in the process give up keyboard and mouse control.What Big Picture needs is a hardware experience that matches the software. A console-ish box that looks nice in the entertainment center and offers the Big Picture experience above anything else. A decent sized Linux box that has been optimized to run Steam in Big Picture mode isn’t even that complicated. Once Steam for Linux is released I am sure there will be several builds that accomplish exactly this.What if Roku made a special version of their TV kit that included a Big Picture channel and the hardware inside necessary to enjoy it? Or if Alienware took some of the design chops that has gone into their X51 Best Price at Amazon and made a TV-focused piece of hardware that just ran Steam Big Picture? It wouldn’t be hard to price the box to compete with current generation gaming consoles, and the chances are good that it would outperform those consoles while offering the massive game library Steam has to offer.Looking at indie game-driven devices like the Ooya Kickstarter, it is more than clear to me that the market is ready to bring fresh blood to our TV screens. Steam is filled with amazing indie games at great prices, to say nothing of the major titles that are added all the time, and the regular sale pricing that can add tens of games  to your library for a few dollars.Right now the console manufacturers are busy creating ecosystems. Microsoft and Sony are so busy offering extras, add-ons, and different types of content to create a lock-in ecosystem, that there’s less focus on the system itself. The Steam community is already massive, and nothing about Big Picture affects their core audience for the moment. Hardware partners would allow Valve to grow Steam in a whole new direction without needing to dedicate internal resources to anything other than making Steam better.It’s obvious that something interesting is going to happen soon. There are too many puzzle pieces here that fit together way too perfectly for there not to be conversations happening about pulling the trigger. Big Picture is a great first step to start moving people to the television for Steam content, but the big news will be when users start to prefer the Big Picture experience in their living rooms over what we have right now. To do that, I hope Valve finds hardware partners so they can continue to focus on the all-important software.last_img read more

WWII Bomb forces people to evacuate Thessaloniki

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram One of the largest-scale evacuations is to take place in Thessaloniki on Sunday, as up to 60,000 are expected to leave their homes, while experts will dispose of an unexploded World War II bomb. The bomb was found in the inner suburb of Kordelio, in the Western area of Greece’s second-largest city, near the central railway station, during work for the expanction of a gas station’s underground tanks. The bomb, which is estimated to weigh 250kg and contain 150kg of explosives, was found buried 5 meters deep and any attempt to remove it has not been successful. The existing underground tanks have since been emptied, to minimize the risk of a potential explosion. The excavator reportedly missed hitting the bomb for just 4 mm, which might have caused a major explosion. Deputy regional governor (and former Olympian) Voula Patoulidou told the Associated Press on Monday that military and police authorities will try to detonate the bomb on the spot. “We are not going to bury it, because if we do, it might bury us in its turn”, she said. Authorities have since called for people living 2 kilometres around the site to keep away for up to five hours on Sunday, during the operation. This is not the first WWII bomb to be found in Greece, but never before has one been found in residential area. “The last thing we need is to panic”, said Voula Patoulidou. “Those in charge of the operation are perfectly qualified and are set to do the best job possible”. The regional government has arranged for buses to transfer people from the area, during the operation, while the army and police forces will secure the perimeter. last_img read more

State Woman wasnt insane had druginduced psychosis

first_imgMEDFORD, Ore. — A woman who stabbed a man in Medford and was judged guilty except for insanity, was released from state psychiatric custody after officials determined she was suffering from drug-induced psychosis — not mental illness.Heather Marie Everman was ordered released from the Oregon State Hospital’s Junction City campus in September 2016, according to an Order of Discharge document obtained by the Mail Tribune.Since her release, she has continued to run afoul of the law for possessing methamphetamine, fighting with law enforcement personnel, trespassing and stealing, court records show.Everman has also been found mentally unfit to aid and assist in her own defense in the new cases — raising questions about her actual mental state, her drug use and the interrelationship between the two.Drug-induced psychosis is not a legal defense for criminal actions because the defendant chose to take drugs. The situation is similar to driving under the influence of intoxicants, in which drivers face legal consequences for their actions.last_img read more

UPDATE Man 75 found reunited with family

first_img A 75-year-old man reported missing Tuesday was found safe and returned to his family, officials said.Frederick Luepke left his east Vancouver home around 9 p.m. Tuesday in a gray 1988 Ford Ranger pickup, according to a sheriff’s office bulletin.Luepke has a mental illness and the sheriff’s office said he may have been disoriented. Frederick Luepkelast_img

Booze bandit swipes bottles from Oakland Park store taunts staff

first_imgOAKLAND PARK, FLA. (WSVN) – Broward Sheriff’s Office are searching for a man who was caught on surveillance video stealing several liquor bottles from an Oakland Park store, then stating his intentions to employees before taking off.The security footage captures the brazen bandit entering the ABC Fine Wine & Spirits along North Federal Highway, near Northeast 20th Avenue, Feb. 12.Cameras then showed the subject shoving bottles of whiskey, tequila and vodka in a bag.Officials said the thief then asked employees what they’d do if he walked out without paying, then made a run for it, knocking one of the staffers down on the way out.If you have any information on this theft, call Broward County Crime Stoppers at 954-493-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $3,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Omar demands Centres assurance on JK status

first_imgSrinagar: Former Jammu and Kashmir chief minister and National Conference (NC) vice president Omar Abdullah on Saturday said he had met Governor Satya Pal Malik to find out what was happening in the state and why nothing was being done to scotch rumours, if those were baseless. “We wanted to know about the current situation in J&K. When we ask officials, they say something is happening, but nobody knows what actually is happening,” Omar told a press conference after meeting Governor Malik here. Also Read – Trinamool, BJP activists scuffle at Dilip Ghosh’s event Advertise With Us He said when Parliament starts functioning the Centre should make a statement on what was the need to end the Amarnath Yatra and pull out tourists from the Valley. “Let Parliament assure us that there is no need for the people to be afraid,” he said. Omar said in his meeting with the Governor he told him about rumours surrounding Article 35A, Article 370, delimitation and even trifurcation of the state. Also Read – NRC in Assam to be released: list to finalize if a person is Indian or Foreigner Advertise With Us “The Governor assured us that in all these issues, no preparation is being made to make any announcement,” Omar said. He also pointed out that the final word on J&K was not the Governor but the government of India. “More than what the Governor tells us publicly, I would like to hear from the government of India that there is nothing the people have to be worried about,” Omar said.last_img read more

Trumps travel ban makes US citizens cancer treatment impossible

first_imgDonald Trump. File photoMaziar Hashemi, a naturalized US citizen who lives in Massachusetts, has been told by doctors that his best hope for surviving a rare form of blood cancer is a bone marrow transplant.President Donald Trump’s travel ban could make that impossible.Bone marrow transplants require a close match between donor and recipient. A few months after his diagnosis last September, Hashemi, 60, learned that his brother in Iran, Kamiar Hashemi, was a rare 100-per cent match. The only problem was Kamiar’s nationality.The latest travel ban, issued as a presidential proclamation and implemented on 8 December after months of legal wrangling, bars most travellers to the United States from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad and North Korea, as well as certain government officials from Venezuela. Although the ban allows for case-by-case waivers to be granted, including for medical need, Kamiar Hashemi has so far been denied a visa.Attorneys who regularly deal with visa issues say the waiver process is opaque. Visa applicants aren’t allowed to apply for waivers; they are simply granted or not without explanation. US officials won’t say how they make their decisions or how long they generally take.A US State Department official told Reuters that since the ban took effect, more than 375 waivers have been approved but he declined to say how many total visa applications have been filed from countries covered by the ban. He said he could not comment on the specifics of Hashemi’s case.Kamiar Hashemi began the visa application process soon after learning he was a match for his brother. In February, the 57-year-old small business owner travelled to Armenia to be interviewed at the US embassy there, since there is no embassy in Iran.Later on the day of the interview, Kamiar’s brother back in Massachusetts checked the status of the application on the State Department’s website. A pop-up window announced in bright blue letters: “Refused.”Waivers can later be granted to applicants initially refused for visas, according to the State Department, so Maziar Hashemi continued checking the website each day, but his brother’s status hasn’t changed. He hired an immigration lawyer, Mahsa Khanbabai, hoping she might smooth the way.Transparent as MudThe Trump administration has said travel restrictions are needed to protect the United States from terrorism.Critics have challenged the latest ban, as they did previous versions, saying that it discriminates against Muslims. Six of the eight countries included in the current ban are majority Muslim.Under the current proclamation, waivers can be granted in cases where denying entry would cause undue hardship, when the individual is found not to be a threat and when their entry is in the national interest.The proclamation lists ten examples of situations in which an applicant might be eligible for a waiver. One reason mentioned is an applicant’s need for urgent medical care, something that comes close but doesn’t exactly fit the Hashemis’ situation, since it isn’t Kamiar Hashemi, himself, in urgent need.The State Department has declined to provide details of how waiver decisions are made beyond some general answers to frequently asked questions posted on its website. But a State Department letter obtained by Reuters earlier this month said “there is no waiver form to be completed” and that applicants who fall into the categories outlined in the proclamation “must be considered” for one.“The process is as transparent as mud,” said Hashemi’s attorney Khanbabai. “There are no clear guidelines. It’s difficult to figure out what the process is and who is actually doing the processing.”Nevertheless, Khanbabai submitted a packet of information on the Hashemis’ behalf to the embassy on 19 March, including a letter from Massachusetts General Hospital explaining that a perfect match for a bone marrow transplant is very rare and could provide the only viable treatment for Maziar Hashemi’s Myelodysplastic syndrome.Worried about the ticking clock, Kamiar Hashemi looked into traveling to India to have his bone marrow harvested there and rushed to the United States, but that option was also thwarted.A non-profit organization trying to facilitate the transfer, Be The Match, said it had to pull out after its legal team concluded that Kamiar’s bone marrow couldn’t be exported to the United States because of US sanctions on Iranian exports.“Can you imagine that the cells of an Iranian needed in order to help a US citizen are embargoed?” said Maziar Hashemi, a civil engineer who has lived in the United States since the 1970s.“It is just unfair,” he said in a phone interview. “I cannot wait much longer.”last_img read more

6 Houston Men Found With 88K Charged In Laredo ATM Robbery

first_img Share Photo via Twitter @ChangeofplanZ1Police say six Houston men have been arrested at a South Texas border checkpoint and charged with stealing $88,000 from an ATM in Laredo.Laredo police spokesman Joe Baeza (by-AY’-zuh) said Thursday that the suspects are charged with aggravated robbery and engaging in organized criminal activity.Police believe the suspects Tuesday robbed a worker servicing an outdoor ATM, fled in an SUV, then switched to a car that was later stopped at a Border Patrol checkpoint.Baeza says five men in the car were detained after cash, believed from the holdup, was found in the trunk of the vehicle. A sixth suspect in another car was also arrested.Laredo police have contacted Houston police investigating ATM-related robberies. In December, ATMs were stolen from the lobbies of five Houston hotels.last_img read more

Pizza Hut Pie Tops Shoes Order Food For You

first_img Las Vegas Pizzeria Offers ‘Grasshopper Pie’ Amid Insect Inva…Domino’s Brings Autonomous Pizza Delivery to Houston Whether shooting hoops on the court or tossing digital three-pointers in your living room, these sneakers will satisfy your hunger—in 30 minutes or it’s free.Pizza Hut has announced an incredibly limited supply of special-edition high-top sneakers, fitted with geolocation technology to deliver a pie with one press.“Pie Tops,” as they’re cunningly called, wirelessly sync with the Pie Tops Mobile app (separate from the regular Pizza Hut application); order by tapping the Hut icon on the shoe’s tongue.Don’t expect to lace up these ’90s throwback threads, though. Only 64 pairs of the handmade sneakers were made, according to AdWeek—one for each of the teams participating in March Madness. Most will be distributed to influencers and the media, though a few Pizza Hut customers may score a pair, the news site said.The Hut is no stranger to multimedia marketing: Ten years ago, the Yum! Brands Inc. subsidiary encouraged folks to text words hidden in TV commercials to receive coupons.Its latest promotion for March and April hopes to tempt people to the Web: Get a large two-topping pizza for $7.99, when you order online.“As far as we know, this has never been done before,” David Daniels, vice president of media and advertising at Yum! Brands told AdWeek. “We feel it’s highly culturally relevant. Sneakers are hot,” he said, sounding like everyone’s hip-to-be-square dad who overuses the word “cool.”“We’ve enlisted a really cool professional to design these shoes for us—the Shoe Surgeon out of LA. These 64 pairs are handmade, and pretty cool.The red-and-white Pie Tops make dinner planning easy. But how do they hold up on the court?“We haven’t gone that far yet,” Daniels said.You’ll have to ask former NBA player Grant Hill, who stars in Pizza Hut’s 30-second ad (above), launching on Monday.“Grant will have a pair,” according to Daniels, “and we’ll have to get his take on the performance nature of them.”Don’t forget to add a sweet Pizza Hut beanie to go with your fly sneaks. Stay on targetlast_img read more

Tokyo Rainbow Pride marchers dazzle in colorful parade

first_img— 東京レインボープライド #TRP (@Tokyo_R_Pride) 6 May 2018LGBTI rights in Japan remain vastly unachieved and can very by each prefecture. Same-sex marriage is not legal and same-sex parents cannot adopt children.Anti-discrimination laws exist in Tokyo, but not for the rest of the country.Trans people also still have to jump through extreme hoops to have their gender updated on official documentation.Check out some of the most colorful photos from the day: Tokyo Rainbow Pride. | Photo: Twitter Tokyo Rainbow Pride in Shibuya.Meiji Avenue shops also cooperated with window display as rainbow design. C’est cool. #tokyorainbowpride pic.twitter.com/LcpuPEarsv— ワタナベアニ (@watanabeani) 6 May 2018 GAYSTARNEWS- Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Popular Japanese music artist Ayumi Hamasaki performed her hit J-pop songs. Also in attendance was American model and actor Max Emerson.LGBTI rights in JapanTokyo’s first Pride parade was in 1994, but only drew small crowds. Due to this, it went through a hiatus from 2008 to 2010. And then again in 2011.As a result, organizers set up Tokyo Rainbow Pride in 2012 to ensure that a Pride parade would be held in the city if Tokyo Pride could not follow through.The Tokyo Rainbow Pride parade happens on the last day of Rainbow Week.#trp2018 #東京レインボープライド #tokyorainbowpride pic.twitter.com/Z73s4rT4pc #trp2018 #東京レインボープライド #tokyorainbowpride pic.twitter.com/DWrkk9FdEf— 東京レインボープライド #TRP (@Tokyo_R_Pride) 6 May 2018 eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Over 7,000 people marched through the country’s capital from Shibuya to Harajuku. This is up from about 5,000 people in 2016.This year’s theme was ‘Love and Equality,’ according to AFP.無事に最終フロートも帰ってきました!パレードは無事終了しました。フェスタとステージ、まだまだお楽しみください! #trp2018 #東京レインボープライド #tokyorainbowpride pic.twitter.com/aOWhDQZ3xN— 東京レインボープライド #TRP (@Tokyo_R_Pride) 6 May 201837 groups entered the parade, including the European ambassador to Japan.Finalists from Japan’s first ever Mr Gay Japan competition also participated in the parade.Winner of the competition Shogo said on Instagram it was his first ever Tokyo Rainbow Pride parade.He wrote in a caption: ‘Lots of people came to say hello and took pictures with me. I have never felt so comfortable about my sexuality in Japan and would love more people to feel the same!’ Thousands marched today (6 May) in Tokyo Rainbow Pride – one of the city’s two annual gay Pride parades. #trp2018 #東京レインボープライド #tokyorainbowpride pic.twitter.com/2hfQJruNuR— 東京レインボープライド #TRP (@Tokyo_R_Pride) 6 May 2018 World Tourism with IGLTA2017 turns to a Rainbow in St. Petersburg, FloridaTokyo will give free housing to homeless and poor LGBTI peopleHere are the 23 best pictures from Amsterdam Pride’s Canal Parade 2018Read the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/tokyo-rainbow-pride-marchers-dazzle-in/last_img read more

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first_img Feature | Molecular Imaging | July 01, 2019 | By Sharvari Rale Transformations in Molecular Imaging Herald Entry to Novel Applications Diagnostic procedures have always been a cornerstone of early prognosis and patient triaging. read more December 2, 2014 — Researchers are using computed tomography (CT) and 3-D printing technology to recreate life-size models of patients’ heads to assist in face transplantation surgery, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).Physicians at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston performed the country’s first full-face transplantation in 2011 and have subsequently completed four additional face transplants. The procedure is performed on patients who have lost some or all of their face as a result of injury or disease.In the study, a research team led by Frank J. Rybicki, M.D., radiologist and director of the hospital’s Applied Imaging Science Laboratory; Bohdan Pomahac, M.D., lead face transplantation surgeon; and Amir Imanzadeh, M.D., research fellow, assessed the clinical impact of using 3-D printed models of the recipient’s head in the planning of face transplantation surgery.”This is a complex surgery and its success is dependent on surgical planning,” Rybicki said. “Our study demonstrated that if you use this model and hold the skull in your hand, there is no better way to plan the procedure.”Each of the transplant recipients underwent preoperative CT with 3-D visualization. To build each life-size skull model, the CT images of the transplant recipient’s head were segmented and processed using customized software, creating specialized data files that were input into a 3-D printer.”In some patients, we need to modify the recipient’s facial bones prior to transplantation,” Imanzadeh said. “The 3-D printed model helps us to prepare the facial structures so when the actual transplantation occurs, the surgery goes more smoothly.”Although the entire transplant procedure lasts as long as 25 hours, the actual vascular connections from the donor face to the recipient typically takes approximately one hour, during which time the patient’s blood flow must be stopped.”If there are absent or missing bony structures needed for reconstruction, we can make modifications based on the 3-D printed model prior to the actual transplantation, instead of taking the time to do alterations during ischemia time,” Rybicki said. “The 3-D model is important for making the transplant cosmetically appealing.”The researchers said they also used the models in the operating room to increase the surgeons’ understanding of the anatomy of the recipient’s face during the procedure.”You can spin, rotate and scroll through as many CT images as you want but there’s no substitute for having the real thing in your hand,” Rybicki said. “The ability to work with the model gives you an unprecedented level of reassurance and confidence in the procedure.”Senior surgeons and radiologists involved in the five face transplantations agreed that the 3-D printed models provided superior pre-operative data and allowed complex anatomy and bony defects to be better appreciated, reducing total procedure time.”Less time spent in the operating room is better for overall patient outcomes,” Pomahac added.Based on the results of this study, 3-D printing is now routinely used for surgical planning for face transplantation procedures at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and 3-D printed models may be implemented in other complex surgeries.For more information: www.rsna.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 PreviousNext Technology | Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 04, 2019 Ann Arbor Startup Launches Augmented Reality MRI Simulator SpellBound, an Ann Arbor startup specializing in augmented reality (AR) tools for children in hospitals, has officially… read more Related Content News | Advanced Visualization | July 03, 2019 TeraRecon Unveils iNtuition AI Data Extractor Artificial Intelligence (AI) and advanced visualization company TeraRecon announced its new iNtuition AI Data Extractor… read more Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Innovations in Radiotherapy and Radiology at Henry Ford Hospital Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res read more A 3-D printed model (left) and a model constructed in augmented reality (right), both of a kidney with a tumor. In both models, the kidney is clear; the tumor is visible in purple on the AR model and in white on the 3-D printed model. Photo courtesy of Nicole Wake, Ph.D. Technology | Advanced Visualization | June 13, 2019 Materialise Receives FDA Clearance for Cardiovascular Planning Software Suite Three-dimensional (3-D) printing software and solutions company Materialise has received U.S. Food and Drug… read more News | Medical 3-D Printing | August 08, 2019 RSNA and ACR to Collaborate on Landmark Medical 3D Printing Registry The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) will launch a new medical… read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 20, 2019 TeraRecon Receives First-of-Kind FDA Determination for Northstar AI Results Explorer Advanced visualization and artificial intelligence (AI) technology provider TeraRecon has successfully completed a U.S… read more Image courtesy of Philips Healthcare Technology | Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 10, 2019 Medivis SurgicalAR Gets FDA Clearance Medivis announced that its augmented reality (AR) technology platform for surgical applications, SurgicalAR, has… read more Feature | December 02, 2014 Researchers Use 3-D Printing to Guide Human Face Transplants 3-D CT visualization utilized to perform transplants for five patients Henry Ford Hospital’s ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology. Feature | Advanced Visualization | July 02, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis Augmented Reality Versus 3-D Printing for Radiology Three-dimensional (3-D) printing and… read more last_img read more

VIDEO How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures

first_imgVideos | Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:47Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:47 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Technology Reports View all 9 items RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Conference Coverage View all 396 items Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Recent Videos View all 606 items Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Women’s Health View all 62 items Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Information Technology View all 220 items Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiation Oncology View all 91 items last_img read more