Australia womens cricket captain to promote cricket in China

first_imgMumbai, Apr 11 (PTI) Meg Lanning, captain of the Australian womens cricket team that finished runner-up to the West Indies in the ICC World T20 Championship, is off to China to train with the countrys national team in Shanghai. Lannings visit is part of a joint Cricket Australia and International Cricket Council delegation to the April Australia Week in China, a Cricket Australia media release said today. “Lanning will join the Chinese national womens cricket team training camp in Shanghai, take part in a cricket clinic for Shanghai students, and attend the Australia Week in China gala lunch hosted by the Australian Government,” it said. Having narrowly missed out on qualifying for the recent ICC Womens World T20 held in India, China is considered a rising cricket-playing nation having a realistic chance to qualify for the Womens World T20 in 2018 and 2020. There are currently 80,000 cricket participants in China, approximately half of whom are female. In Shanghai ? where Meg will assist the national Chinese womens team training camp ? cricket is played in 18 of the citys 40 universities, the CA release stated. As recent evidence of the progress being made in the region, Chinese national player Wu Juan received a rookie contract with the Melbourne Stars in the inaugural Womens Big Bash T20 League (WBBL) organised in Australia, it added. “Im looking forward to visiting China and seeing the development of cricket there first-hand. Weve seen how quickly womens cricket has grown across the world ? and in particular Australia ? recently so its exciting to know the game is growing in China. “Hopefully well be facing up to the Chinese women at the 2018 or 2020 ICC World T20, which would be a massive boost for women?s cricket,” said Lanning who will be in China from April 13-17. ICCs Head of Global Development Tim Anderson, who will accompany Lanning on the trip, said, “China is one of the ICCs target markets in our vision to become the worlds favourite sport. In particular, we see the development of womens cricket and the engagement of government as two important elements to crickets growth in China.” PTI SSR GK SSC SSC PTPadvertisementlast_img read more

Agencies Advise Banks on CyberSecurity

first_img Ellie Mae FDIC Security 2014-04-13 Colin Robins Agencies Advise Banks on Cyber-Security in Daily Dose, Featured, Headlines, News, Technology April 13, 2014 468 Views center_img A release issued Thursday by FDIC urged financial institutions to “actively utilize available resources to identify and help mitigate potential cyber-related risks.” The timing of the release is particularly germane, considering the recently discovered Heartbleed bug which affects almost two-thirds of the web, as well as recent cyber-attacks on industry giant Ellie Mae.”Cyber threats have been widely covered in the national media, and we believe that financial institutions and their technology service providers have been managing system updates to mitigate potential vulnerabilities in an effective manner,” said Doreen Eberley, Director of the FDIC Division of Risk Management Supervision.The FDIC release would appear to reference the recently discovered Heartbleed bug. The bug, according to the appropriately named Heartbleed.com, “is a serious vulnerability in the popular OpenSSL cryptographic software library. This weakness allows stealing the information protected, under normal conditions, by the SSL/TLS encryption used to secure the Internet.”The site continues, “SSL/TLS provides communication security and privacy over the Internet for applications such as web, email, instant messaging (IM) and some virtual private networks (VPNs).”SSL, or secure sockets layer, is a standard web protocol used for encrypting secure data. A computer using SSL sends a request to another computer, verifying the other computer is in fact the one it is attempting to reach. If successful, the second computer responds with data verifying itself, and a handshake occurs to exchange data securely.Heartbleed exploits this connection.”Web servers that use the affected versions of the code store some data unprotected in memory. Hackers can grab that data, and reconstruct information about users or keys that would allow them to monitor past or future encrypted traffic,” according to a report by the Wall Street Journal.The Wall Street Journal article commented on possible actions for consumers: “If you need strong anonymity or privacy,” Roger Dingledine, president of the Tor Project, a web service used to obscure Internet users’ identity, wrote in a blog post, “you might want to stay away from the Internet entirely for the next few days while things settle.”More recently, cyber security has been in the news with respect to attacks on large institutions. A recent attack against Ellie Mae resulted in slowdowns and overwhelmed servers.The FDIC urges financial institutions to “ensure that their Information Security staff are aware of and subscribe to reliable and recognized resources that can help quickly identify cyber risks as they emerge.”Specifically, the FDIC recommends United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT), U.S. Secret Service Electronic Crimes Task Force (ECTF), FBI InfraGard, Regional Coalitions, and the Information Sharing and Analysis Centers (ISACs)More detailed technical information about the Heartbleed bug can be found here. Sharelast_img read more