Supreme Court cases prelude to marriage debate at General Convention

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 28, 2015 Doug Desper says: Supporters of same sex marriage rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court before the court heard arguments about gay marriage in Washington April 28. The nine justices of the Supreme Court are deciding whether the Constitution provides same-sex couples the right to marry, taking up a contentious social issue in what promises to be the year’s most anticipated ruling. Photo: Joshua Roberts/Reuters[Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians who followed the April 28 U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments on whether same-sex couples have a constitutional right to be married were no doubt looking ahead to the implications of the court’s eventual ruling for this summer’s General Convention.The Episcopal Church officially has advocated for equal treatment of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in both the civil and ecclesial arenas for years. However, it was not until 2012 that the General Convention voted to consider anew the church’s theology of marriage, and LGBT Episcopalians’ access to the sacramental rite.Thus, while the court’s ruling, expected to come before the current terms ends in late June or early July, may settle the issue of access to civil marriage and fulfill one of The Episcopal Church’s long-held public-policy stances, its decision could come as the convention is debating the church’s understanding of sacramental marriage and the accompanying canonical definition of marriage. The 78th meeting of the General Convention takes place June 25-July 3 in Salt Lake City, Utah.The church’s advocacy for civil equality for LGBT persons began in 1976 with Resolution A071 in which it said “homosexual persons are entitled to equal protection of the laws with all other citizens, and calls upon our society to see that such protection is provided in actuality.” That same convention said (in Resolution A069) that “homosexual persons are children of God who have a full and equal claim with all other persons upon the love, acceptance, and pastoral concern and care of the Church.”From then on, the trend continued, including these resolutions:1994: Resolution D006 called for local, state and the federal government to give gay and lesbian couples the same rights and protections as non-gay married couples.2000: Resolution D039 affirmed that some people in the church live in relationships outside of marriage and outlined the expected characteristics of those relationships.2006: Resolution A095 said the church opposed state or federal constitutional amendment prohibiting same-sex civil marriages or civil unions.2009: Resolution D025 recognized that the baptized membership of church includes same-sex couples living in lifelong committed relationship, that LGBT people participate in lay and ordained ministry.2012: Resolution D018 noted the church “is a period of discernment about the meaning of Christian marriage, with faithful people holding divergent views,” and urged Congress to repeal federal laws that discriminate against same-sex civilly married couples; and pass legislation allowing the federal government to provide benefits to them.Also in 2012, bishops and deputies allowed clergy to bless same-sex relationships with the permission of their bishop. They authorized a rite for those blessings (Resolution A049) and called (in Resolution A050) for a task force to “identify and explore biblical, theological, historical, liturgical, and canonical dimensions of marriage.” The convention asked what became known as the Task Force on the Study of Marriage to examine the “changing societal and cultural norms and legal structures” surrounding marriage.(A complete list with links to all related General Convention resolutions from 1976 to 2012 on liturgy, marriage and ordination in addition to resolutions on LGBT civil rights is here).Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori“Personally, I continue to give thanks for the way in which Episcopalians and people of good faith in the U.S. and far beyond are learning to see the image of God in all God’s children, whether gay, straight, transgender, short, blonde or anything else,” Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori told Episcopal News Service on April 28. “God’s ability to create in diverse ways is a sign that we will never fully know the divine mind and that we have gifts to receive from all that God offers us. The task of the church is to help people live lives of holiness, loving God and loving our neighbors as ourselves – all our neighbors.”House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark JenningsIn an interview with ENS on April 28, House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings said she believed that “our church’s long discernment on LGBT equality in civil law and our subsequent discussion about sacramental marriage equality are part of what’s moved the broader culture to the point of today’s Supreme Court arguments.” The Episcopal Church’s work joins “with other religious traditions that are also wresting with their legacy of homophobia,” she added.The Rev. Canon Susan Russell, a longtime advocate for the full inclusion of gays and lesbians in the church and who proposed Resolution 2012-D018, told ENS that “the Holy Spirit is smack dab in the middle of both our General Convention and the Supreme Court schedule.”Convention will face various same-sex marriage proposalsThe marriage task force, the standing commission that proposed its creation and, to date, four dioceses are urging this summer’s meeting of convention to move toward greater clarity in its understanding of the availability of the sacramental rite of marriage to both different- and same-sex couples.The Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music asks in its report (beginning on page 3 here) that convention authorize an expanded version of “Liturgical Resources I: I Will Bless You and You Will Be A Blessing,” the liturgy for blessing same-sex relationships and accompanying resources whose use was authorized in 2012. The new version (on pages 2-151 here includes three additional liturgies: “The Witnessing and Blessing of a Marriage”; “The Celebration and Blessing of a Marriage 2”; and “The Form of Solemnization of Matrimony.” Those rites offer the option of using “wife,” “husband,” “person,” or “spouse,” thus making them applicable for both heterosexual and same-sex couples.The commission’s proposed Resolution A054 says diocesan bishops must approve use of the rites. It also says that bishops within civil jurisdictions where same-sex marriage, civil unions or domestic partnerships are legal may continue to provide “generous pastoral response” to meet the needs of church members (an echo of Resolution 2009-C056).And the proposed resolution repeats the provision in Resolution 2012-A049 that “no bishop, priest, deacon or lay person should be coerced or penalized in any manner, nor suffer any canonical disabilities” as a result of his or her theological objection to or support of the resolution. The resolution also would extend to these new rites the provision in the church’s Canon I.18.4, which says that clergy may decline to solemnize any marriage.The Task Force for the Study of Marriage asks that The Episcopal Church go further, proposing in its Resolution A036 to revise Canon I.18 titled “Of the Solemnization of Holy Matrimony” (page 58 of The Episcopal Church’s canons here).Among many edits, the revision removes references to marriage as being between a man and a woman.The revision would recast the requirement in the canon’s first section that clergy conform to both “the laws of the state” and “the laws of this Church” about marriage. The rewritten portion would require that clergy conform to “the laws of the State governing the creation of the civil status of marriage, and also to these canons concerning the solemnization of marriage.”And the proposal preserves the canon’s provision that clergy may decline to solemnize any given marriage and extends that discretion to include the choice to decline to bless a marriage.Among the four diocese-proposed actions, Resolution C017 from the Diocese of Chicago and Resolution C022 from the Diocese of California both ask the convention to authorize the use of the marriage rites in The Book of Common Prayer 1979  and in Liturgical Resources I “for all marriages legal in the civil jurisdiction in which the liturgy takes place.” In civil jurisdictions with same-sex marriage, the rites’ language would be interpreted as gender-neutral. C022 also proposes a rewrite of the solemnization canon.The Diocese of Rochester, in Resolution C007, and the Diocese of Los Angeles in C009 simply ask that convention “take any and all steps necessary to make the Rite of Holy Matrimony available to same-sex couples throughout The Episcopal Church immediately.”All of these resolutions and other related ones that might arise have been assigned to the General Convention’s Special Legislative Committee on Marriage, formally a bishop committee meeting alongside a deputy committee but voting separately, announced in July 2014 by Jefferts Schori and Jennings.Facing the issue of making space for dissentersA possible crux of the issue at convention could be the question of whether and how to provide space for those Episcopalians who oppose changing the definition of marriage in either the civil or ecclesial contexts, or both.Diocese of Northern Indiana Bishop Ed LittleDiocese of Northern Indiana Bishop Ed Little told ENS recently that The Episcopal Church has a “mixed economy” with “a progressive majority that would be in favor of redefining marriage in terms of its civil expression and would also be in favor of redefining marriage in it sacramental expression.” And, there is a not-insubstantial conservative or traditional minority that is “concerned that both sets of developments move us away from marriage as it’s been experienced by both the human community and ecclesial community for thousands of years.”Both groups have “space to flourish,” which “gives the Holy Spirit space to work,” Little said, because of the provisions in resolutions 2009-C056 and 2012-A049.“At the moment, I have the space to live my conscience within the church, but it’s worrisome if marriage is redefined canonically,” he said. “That seems to narrow the options and seems to say that those who hold to ancient and traditional perspectives don’t have an honored place in our community.”Russell said both the SCLM and the task force proposals exhibit the “Anglican genius” of recognizing that “as a church, we are a big tent; that we do hold in tension the difference that exists amongst us.” The Episcopal Church has always moved forward on divisive issues striving for “comprehensiveness, not unanimity,” she said.“No matter what we do at General Convention, it will be too much for some and too little for others,” she predicted.The trajectory of women’s ordination is, Little said, a “cautionary tale” in which those opposed to female priests and bishops were “sort of honored and then eventually merely tolerated and then ultimately canonically excluded.”After General Convention agreed in 1976 that women could be priests and bishops (they already were being ordained deacons), then-Presiding Bishop John Allin told an October 1977 House of Bishops meeting he did not think “that women can be priests any more than they can become fathers or husbands,” and he offered to resign as presiding bishop. Instead, the bishops affirmed his leadership and adopted “A Statement of Conscience” saying that “no Bishop, Priest, or Lay Person should be coerced or penalized in any manner, nor suffer any canonical disabilities as a result of his or her conscientious objection to or support” of women’s ordination.Since the “conscience clause” was never adopted by the House of Deputies, it had no canonical authority. But, a handful of bishops and their dioceses used it to bar women from the priesthood for 33 more years.Twenty years later, General Convention said that refusing to ordain women was no longer an option. In 2000, it called for monitoring of the three dioceses (Fort Worth, San Joaquin and Quincy) that still did not ordain women.“The result has been that people of a very traditional perspective who were not able to embrace, for theological reason, the ordination of women no longer felt welcomed,” Little said. “Most are gone. There are a few still in the church, but they are on the margins of the church”Little said he has ordained more women than men, “but I also grieve that that traditional perspective is really canonically no longer viable in the church.”In Salt Lake City, during what he intends to be his last General Convention as a diocesan bishop, Little will oppose any revision of the solemnization canon that would redefine marriage, he said. He would like the convention to preserve the “conscience” provision in the blessing resolution.Russell said she thought the discretion that has always been granted to clergy in the marriage canon and the protections afforded to clergy in all of the states currently allowing same-sex marriage were sufficient protection.And Jennings, while not commenting directly on the issue of a conscience clause, said, “I don’t think where a couple can get married should be an accident of geography, either civilly or within the church.”No matter what happens in Salt Lake City, Little said, he will “continue to advocate for the recognition that across the church people are dealing with these difficult issues in different ways – people of deep commitment and deep integrity – and so we’ve got to find a way that their consciences could be honored.”“The issues are significant. They impact the deepest places of our heart, but I hope that all of us will recognize, wherever we come down on these issues, that our commitment to Jesus Christ, our love for him and above all his for us, is what binds us together,” he said. “We have to recognize that in fractious times Jesus is our only hope. You can’t legislate that, but in the end the only thing that will keep us together is Jesus himself.”The Rev. Canon Susan RussellRussell cited Jesus as well, saying, “I firmly believe in my deepest heart of hearts that nothing short of full inclusion of the gay and lesbian, bisexual and transgender baptized is good enough for Jesus and us, and it’s a journey to get to that goal.”Insisting she is not an “incrementalist,” but instead an “Anglican pragmatist,” Russell said she’d like to see that full inclusion enunciated in the Book of Common Prayer. “And what I want to come out of Salt Lake City with is approval from The Episcopal Church that will stand unequivocally for ending discrimination against same-sex marriage, recognizing that we have people within this body for whom that is not congruent with their theology.”Little said he was “in it for the long haul whatever happens and to retain whatever voice I can” and continue to try to build bridges in the church. Russell said she was not going anywhere either. “The only threat we have ever made is to continue to keep coming back,” she said, adding that the patron saint of her and her like-minded colleagues is the persistent widow. “We haven’t threatened to leave, we haven’t threatened to pull our pledges, we haven’t threatened to do anything other than to keep showing up.”Episcopalians advocate for marriage equalityThe Supreme Court justices earlier this year announced they would consider same-sex marriage bans in Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and Michigan that had been upheld in November by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. All other federal appeals courts that have ruled on the issue have struck down such bans.The justices also took the unusual step of framing the issues for which it would use the cases to make their decision.. The first is whether the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution requires a state to license a marriage between two people of the same sex. The second is whether the Fourteenth Amendment requires a state to recognize a marriage between two people of the same sex when their marriage was lawfully licensed and performed out-of-state.The Supreme Court’s decision to consider the cases, known as Obergefell v. Hodges and Consolidated Cases, has attracted much attention and 145 amicus curiae, or “friend of the court,” briefs had been filed as of April 27. The filers range from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops to labor unions, and include the Columbia Law School Sexuality and Gender Law Clinic, and the Historians of Marriage together with the American Historical Association.One brief was filed by the mayors of 226 U.S. cities and another came from 167 members of the U.S. House of Representatives and 44 U.S. senators. Nearly 380 employers, including Microsoft, the National Football Champion New England Patriots and small businesses such as Crazy Misfits Pets Service in Kent, Washington, filed another.Nearly 2,000 individual lay and ordained religious leaders, led by lead signers Jennings and Episcopal Church bishops in Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Tennessee (the states included in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals), filed one of those briefs.Those bishops include Kentucky Bishop Terry Allen White; Lexington Bishop Douglas Hahn; Michigan Bishop Wendell N. Gibbs Jr.; Western Michigan Bishop Whayne M. Hougland Jr.; Northern Michigan Bishop Rayford J. Ray; Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley; Ohio Bishop Mark Hollingsworth Jr.; Ohio Assisting Bishops David C. Bowman, William D. Persell and Arthur B. Williams Jr.; Southern Ohio Bishop Thomas E. Breidenthal; retired Southern Ohio Bishop Suffragan Kenneth L. Price Jr.; Southern Ohio Assisting Bishop Bavi Edna Rivera; West Tennessee Bishop Don E. Johnson; and East Tennessee Bishop George D. Young III. All of the bishops have authorized the blessing of same-sex couples in their dioceses, including for couples who have already entered into civil marriages in other jurisdictions.Diocese of Vermont Bishop Tom Ely, Diocese of Hawaii Bishop Robert Fitzpatrick, Diocese of Southeast Florida Bishop Leo Frade, Diocese of Maine Bishop Steve Lane, Diocese of Atlanta Assistant Bishop Keith Whitmore and nearly 200 ordained and lay Episcopalians also signed onto the brief.The brief outlines how a number of Protestant denominations, branches of Judaism and certain Muslim groups have come to call for marriage equality. It notes that the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A), the largest U.S. Presbyterian denomination, last summer asked its members to redefine marriage as being between “two people, traditionally a man and a woman.” The necessary constitutional change has since earned the approval of the majority of that church’s presbyteries.The brief’s signers argue that “eliminating discrimination in civil marriage will not impinge upon religious doctrine, conscience, or practice. All religions would remain free … to define religious marriage in any way they choose.” The brief notes that such freedom currently exists in the 36 states which, along with the District of Columbia, permit same-sex couples to marry.“The reason I signed the brief is that it’s long, long past time to end any kind of legal discrimination against God’s children in this country,” Jennings told ENS. “A reversal of the Sixth Circuit’s decision would bring us closer to the day of justice and reconciliation that I think people of all faiths long to see”Little, of Northern Indiana, said he was concerned about the Supreme Court advocacy by some Episcopalians because it seemed to show the majority of the church moving away from the recognition of the “mixed economy” he appreciates. Those advocates, he said, “may be attempting to portray the church as monochromatic when it comes to these very difficult, very sensitive theological, pastoral issues.”The advocacy, he said, “often does not recognize the fact that those who are signing briefs and so on are not speaking for the church; they’re speaking for themselves, but it sounds as though they’re speaking for the church.”Jefferts Schori declined to join the brief because while The Episcopal Church has an official policy of seeking civil marriage equality, she said, “we do not have such policy for sacramental marriage.”“I do not believe this church can or should sign amicus briefs where our own community has not formally accepted the premises that underlie such briefs,” she said. “I believe that most Episcopalians would assert that our theological position about the sacrament of marriage has greater moral weight than civil law.”“Until our canon law changes, I see no other option,” she said. “We have come a long way, but we have not yet reached a conclusion.  I ask your prayers as the Church seeks greater clarity.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service.Editor’s note: The U.S. Supreme Court has posted audio recordings and written transcripts of the April 28 oral arguments on its website here. The New York Times, among other news sites, live blogged the arguments. Marriage Equality, General Convention, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Donald Henderson says: Submit a Job Listing Same-Sex Marriage Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET April 30, 2015 at 5:40 pm Michael, those of us on the “extremist” Right haven’t failed to read or reflect upon either the Bible or the First Amendment. We simply came to conclusions that differed from those of you on the extremist Left. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Julian Malakar says: Marie Alford-Harkey says: Submit a Press Release April 29, 2015 at 10:51 am A very good, comprehensive article on the subject. I’d like to comment on what Bishop Ed Little is quoted as saying: “At the moment, I have the space to live my conscience within the church, but it’s worrisome if marriage is redefined canonically. That seems to narrow the options and seems to say that those who hold to ancient and traditional perspectives don’t have an honored place in our community.”Bishop Little seems to say that those who hold to traditional perspectives have an honored place in our community only if they are not asked to share that place with others. The proposed canon does not take away the space for traditional conscience and practices. In fact, it expands our church’s options so that our community can honor both those with traditional and more contemporary views on marriage.Brian Taylor, Chair, Task Force on the Study of Marriage Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Michael R. Scullary says: April 29, 2015 at 1:14 pm “Ah, the generous liberalism of those who want their way! Pleading for themselves a Big Tent of Via Media, pleading for understanding, pushing for room for difference, diversity, and Ubuntu…until others just don’t agree with them.”Right, Doug…..because those aspects are absolutely evil and horrible notions. It seems like certain conservatives might do better to embrace a “Big Tent” philosophy, since this is, after all, the 21st Century. At the end of the day, the Supreme Court will most likely rule against you. Why? Because equality is a civil and Constitutional principle: “We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility…promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity…” It seems the GLBT community deserves the same civil protections as everyone else, don’t you think? Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest April 29, 2015 at 12:44 pm Doug, I’d also like to see Biblical quotations from God and Jesus in which THEY — NOT the assorted/diverse/human Apostles/Disciples/Prophets — specifically addressed marriage aspects and who could get married in general. God, via the Ten Commandments, makes no mention of it, and Jesus is, in my opinion, somewhat obvious on where He might stand on the issue, given His nature of moving against social/cultural norms of the time.Aside from that, many of the Founders were quite clear on how they felt about organized religion in general — hence the First Amendment, which like the Bible, many on the extremist ‘Right’ have failed to read/reflect upon. I do agree that, regardless of what the secular Supreme Court decision is, The ECUSA needs to debate the issue as a religious issue. Julian Malakar says: April 28, 2015 at 8:50 pm Nice roundup of the stories both SCOTUS and TEC — but the headline seems a bit full of ourselves – the Supreme Court is not just a prelude to General Convention, it is a game changer for the USA and most will not care what happens at GC. Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments (19) Supreme Court cases prelude to marriage debate at General Convention April 29, 2015 at 1:01 pm Doug, answering specific questions about adultery/divorce between husbands and wives, and throwing in a “BUT GAYS AND LESBIANS CAN’T MARRY!” are two separate issues and an attempt to put words in Jesus’ mouth. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Laurent DePrins says: Brian Taylor says: Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL April 29, 2015 at 7:32 am I am baffled by the Presiding Bishop’s statement. She says that TEC has a policy of seeking civil marriage equality, but that she declined to sign the brief because TEC has no policy yet on sacramental marriage equality. However, the arguments and cases before the Supreme Court have only to do with civil marriage equality, obviously. Her statement just doesn’t make sense to me. I’m very grateful that the President of the House of Deputies added her name. May 5, 2015 at 12:29 am Laurent, there are no conflict of loving our neighbors, even though any Christian’s neighbor is gay, because our Lord God commanded us to love our neighbor with definition of neighbor. Moreover who are we to judge other? But the question arises whether or not God bless homosexuality. Biblical history about God’s love towards His people always speaks about condemnation of homosexuality; there is not a single incident we find when God bless committed love between two homosexual couple like marriage between single man and women or polygamy like Israel (Jacob), King David, Solomon, etc. Genesis 2:18 The LORD God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone. I will make a helper suitable for him.” We know helper was woman, not another man. Who would take responsibility at time of Final Judgement if any Church teaches wrong doctrine of God? We Christians believe Final Judgement is real like courts of Caesar which is run according to constitution, but the Church runs according to teaching of the Bible and Disciples of Christ. Donald Henderson says: Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK April 29, 2015 at 11:10 pm Church’s goal and objective is to guide its entire sheep pass thru narrow gates of Heaven, as Jesus depicted about Kingdom of Heaven. Though God gave us abundant life, but at the same time we have thorn in our body as Apostle Paul acknowledge in 2 Corinthians 12:7. We have to carry our pain of thorn like Jesus being God Himself carried His own cross to free us from devil. There is old saying “”No gain without pain”. Life is not bed of roses. Is this backward thinking for our salvation? Those who believe rewriting marriage definition is progressive minded to understand Holy mind of God, I would say they believe in the attitude “I am OK, you are not” and may fall under the principle of life that Jesus taught us to follow “So the last will be first, and the first will be last.” Matthew 20:16. There were human development since 1st family Adam and Eve such as abolition of slavery system, equal rights for man and women etc. All changes came in consistence with biblical teaching; there was no need of rewriting of definition. Why now?We all know that homosexuality in human flesh is nothing new to Jesus Christ, because He created all seen and unseen things, including living organisms and its reproductive system. Since biblical time it is mentioned as negative character in human development to grow like child of God. If it is not true why did Christ or any prophets under old covenant, apostles in new covenant with blood of Christ referred it as positive to live together to glory of God? Task Force has difficulties finding any biblical reference, ensuring blessing of God for same sex, satisfying all Disciples of Christ. Goal of State is to ensure justice, happiness and prosperity of its entire citizen; if people want it can rewrite definition of marriage to ensure justice for same sex couple. But in Church, Christ is the authority, He is the body of the Church, church leaders only maintain God’s law to guide his entire sheep to kingdom of heaven no matter how narrow the gate is. May 2, 2015 at 11:57 am History of Marriage:http://www.livescience.com/37777-history-of-marriage.htmlNRSV Online:https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=leveticus+20%3A10&version=NRSVTo anyone with the same opinion as Doug:(I am a heterosexual 20 year old, an active Episcopalian, and a student at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.) I invite you to copy and paste the links above and see what they have to say. The fist link is on the history of marriage. From my understanding, marriage has not been a major part of the church for very long. Actually, marriage has also been redefined several times. For example, how did we decide to move away from arranged marriages? Should we go back to that? Or wait a minute; there are several parts of the bible that have polygamy as a way of life. Should we go back to having a polygamous life? Of course not. We have gone away from that because we have looked at the bible as a whole rather than taking one line and living by it. These instances where a person takes one line from the bible and decides that this is how people should live is wrong. The second link I provided above is to a verse from Leviticus stating that anyone who commits adultery should be put to death. Do we continue to kill those who commit adultery? I don’t know about others but I am uncomfortable with the thought of putting ANYONE to death for their HUMANLY mistakes. Going back to marriage, if we are unable to move forward and allow our brothers and sisters in Christ to marry their lifelong partner whether it be a heterosexual couple or a homosexual couple, we will not be able to live out the two most important commandments of God as written in the Book of Common Prayer:“Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and withall thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and greatcommandment. And the second is like unto it: Thou shaltlove thy neighbor as thyself. On these two commandmentshang all the Law and the Prophets.”We must love our neighbors for who they are. Our homosexual brothers and sisters are just as wonderful as our heterosexual brothers and sisters. Marriage should be a commitment between two people who truly love each other and who want to commit to a lifelong relationship. We are not conforming to Caesar but recognizing that we must create equality within the church in order to be inclusive and loving of all peoples. Hence LOVING our neighbors as ourselves. I am sorry if I have offended any person’s thoughts of what marriage should be. The question for each person on the earth is, “How long will we discriminate against our neighbor, rather than love them for who they are?” We are taught that God loves us no matter what but we are always straying from that belief. We are all sinners in some form or another. But being homosexual is most definitely not a sin when you look at the bible collectively. Michael R. Scullary says: Julian Malakar says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Doug Desper says: May 6, 2015 at 4:22 pm Left? Right? Where two or three are gathered together in His name there will He be also. We do not rest on the bible alone but on prophecy as well. Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 May 3, 2015 at 8:00 pm Laurent: I have no “Doug” opinion. I have read our catechism, National canons, BCP Marriage rites since The Reformation — and those before. All of which base their credibility on Scripture and catholic Christianity. We can’t just turn all of that off because it’s 2015. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Laurent De Prins says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME April 30, 2015 at 10:23 pm Michael:“Have you not read that he who made them from the beginning made them male and female, and said, ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother, and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh?’” Jesus – Matthew 19:4-6 (reference to Genesis 2 at verse 5).Is that a Biblical quotation or what?Caesar may make marriage for the State, thus anyone will be able to marry anyone else. Those civil unions are not the subject here. Have one. I don’t object. The society of the Church, however, is not called to mirror and parrot the State. The Church is a society whose currency is the Lordship of Christ. Therefore, for Christians, Christ has confirmed in Matthew 19/Genesis 2 what marriage looks like for believers. The sacrament of Christian Marriage as confirmed by Christ in this Scripture cannot be altered by General Convention because it does not have the competency nor the authority to do so. Power, yes – given to itself by itself, but that is all.By the time of Jesus humanity had experimented with many things and called them relationships and marriages. Gay folk weren’t invented in the 1900s. Jesus, I’m sure, knew of gay folks. The golden opportunity to change marriage into something “new” didn’t happen. Jesus returned the listener then – and now – back to the beginning by saying, “HAVE YOU NOT READ…?”My objection is that the purported marriage study started on the premise that marriage has evolved rather than the certainty of what Jesus called marriage. Marriage had likewise evolved — more like DEvolved — by the time that Jesus spoke Matthew 19. We aren’t so innovative. It’s all been wished for or tried. After a time of human meddling and mucking around Jesus stepped in and returned the subject to where it should have always been.The question for General Convention is, “HAVE YOU NOT READ…?” Human Sexuality, Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Doug Desper says: Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Doug Desper says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA April 29, 2015 at 8:51 am If all goes as expected the General Convention will defy Matthew 19/Genesis 2 and two millenia of Christian teaching and redefine sacramental Christian Marriage because loud voices in the culture say it’s fair to do. I’m not opposed to a same gender union blessing and civil unions – but to redefine Christian Marriage just because the winds and Caesar announce some new thing is allowed is beyond absurd. Generally the theological revisionists are found “fighting the power” by some protest and interruption in order to make themselves noticed. Now, the hypocrisy is that the same revisionists can only plead that Caesar’s change of laws make a new day for us all to get on board with. There is no Scriptural basis to redefine Christian Marriage and there is no Tradition accepted in catholic Christianity to redefine Christian Marriage. That leaves Reason. Reason alone is the source being used to redefine marriage. Given a few minutes, any group in Coffee Hour will have a collective “Aha! Moment” and call attention to how we can make anything – bad or good – seem reasonable to ourselves. Given this weak argument of many of our leaders and General Convention we are next expected to follow them and stand on what is unsustainable?!? What happens when culture and Caesar decide that marriage can next move to other forms? Three people being united in marriage, for example? The door is open when we jettison Matthew 19/Genesis 2 and follow only reason.When the Supreme Court leaves same gender marriage up to the states it will only take a hot minute for loud activists in TEC to abominate those states who won’t go willingly on board, call for boycotts, and otherwise act uncivil to those who have opposite convictions. Ah, the generous liberalism of those who want their way! Pleading for themselves a Big Tent of Via Media, pleading for understanding, pushing for room for difference, diversity, and Ubuntu…until others just don’t agree with them. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab April 29, 2015 at 12:10 pm Brian — If we were supposed to study Christian Marriage why did your Task Force exclude Jesus’ word on marriage in Matthew19 where He confirmed the design for human relations in Genesis 2? It seems an important place to start for a Church. Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH May 6, 2015 at 4:19 pm I am made in God’s image and I am Loved for the child of God that I am and therefore blessed. Comments are closed. Terry Francis says: May 8, 2015 at 4:09 pm While there is no specific mention of God blessing gay relationships, there is also no specific condemnation of such either, if you actually do your homework and read scripture. Jesus never addresses sexuality in scripture except to prevent a single person from being condemned to death by stoning. His actions speak loudly to not condemning, and watching out for being the one who picks up the stone of judgement to hurl it toward another. As to turning off Scripture and catholic Christianity the Church world wide has historically done just that. It is one of the reasons we no longer advocate slavery, we no longer abandon orphans or widows, and we negate polygamist marriage. One should really study the history of scripture and Christian practice if they are going to speak with authority. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Michael R. Scullary says: May 6, 2015 at 4:13 pm It is a thing of prophecy spoken of. Be careful when you pretend to know what the future will bring as a direct result of the thing you claim not to be against. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Ann Fontaine says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA April 29, 2015 at 12:31 am Our Lord Jesus Christ taught us in Mark 12:17 to give back to Caesar what is Caesar’s and to God what is God’s. Supreme Court’s decision on rights of same sex couple according to constitution has nothing to do with Church’s decision on sacramental marriage right of same sex couple. Church will decide whether same sex marriage falls according to God’s will based on sound biblical, theological, historical, liturgical and canonical dimensions of marriage. “Liturgical Resources I: I Will Bless You and You Will Be A Blessing,” to my opinion is not sufficient for sacramental marriage, we need more godly resources to justify same sex marriage like marriage of one man and one woman. As our Presiding Bishop stated above that task of the Church is to help people live lives of holiness, same way task of words of God in the Bible is to guide the Church to lead Christ’s sheep according to will of God and to be His Children. We have to remember God invites all His children but at the end only few will be chosen, gats are very narrow to filter out disqualified children. May God bless our Church to take right decision! Church and State has been separated by our founding fathers so that Church can run according to will of God, not by liking of the people, but State run according will of the people, by the people and for the people. General Convention 2015, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Donald Henderson says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Un panel se concentra en el ‘instrumento de poder del…

first_imgUn panel se concentra en el ‘instrumento de poder del desarrollo sostenible’ para mujeres y niñas El evento tiene lugar al mismo tiempo en que sesiona la Comisión de Naciones Unidas sobre la Condición de la Mujer Por Lynette Wilson Posted Mar 17, 2016 Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tagscenter_img Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York UNCSW Rector Shreveport, LA De izquierda a derecha, Rosemary Williams, la moderadora, y las panelistas Caroline Herewini, Dana Dankin, Rda. Paula Nesbitt y Ann Smith, durante un panel sobre “Desarrollo sostenible: instrumento de poder para mujeres y niñas”. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service] Empoderar a las mujeres y niñas desde abajo es posible para cambiar a comunidades completas: reducir la pobreza y los índices de violencia doméstica y garantizar que las niñas reciban educación. Incluso es posible cambiar a los hombres.“Creo que el desarrollo económico nunca será una realidad a menos que alcance a las mujeres y a las niñas”, dijo Dana Dankin —fundadora de Consorcio de Mujeres [Women’s Trust] una organización que funciona en Ghana y que capacita a mujeres y niñas a través de microempresas, educación y acceso a la atención sanitaria—, durante un panel sobre desarrollo sostenible que tuvo lugar el 16 de marzo.Trabajando con mujeres, desarrollando relaciones “bajo el radar”, fuera de la vista de la corrupción, continuó Dankin, es posible proporcionarles a las mujeres y las niñas los recursos y un marco para que construyan su propio camino para escapar de la pobreza.Dankin compartió su experiencia de más de 20 años en un evento paralelo a la Conferencia de Naciones Unidas sobre la Condición de la Mujer centrado en “El desarrollo sostenible: instrumento de poder para mujeres y niñas”. Las panelistas presentaron sus colaboraciones con el desarrollo sostenible, describiendo específicamente cómo contribuye al empoderamiento económico de mujeres y niñas.Además de servir de plataforma para compartir historias acerca de lo que funciona en este terreno, el panel se propuso aglutinar en una red a personas que con frecuencia trabajan aisladamente para lograr fines semejantes, dijo la moderadora Rosemary Williams, fundadora y directora de Perspectiva de Mujeres [Women’s Perspective] una organización sin fines de lucro con sede en Connecticut  que ofrece programas educativos centrados en el empoderamiento económico de mujeres y niñas en todo el mundo.Auspiciado por Perspectiva de Mujeres y Empoderamiento de Mujeres Anglicanas, el evento se celebró en el Auditorio del Ejército de Salvación, a unas 10 cuadras al norte de la sede de Naciones Unidas donde están teniendo lugar las discusiones oficiales de la UNCSW. Williams, miembro fundadora de Empoderamiento de Mujeres Anglicanas y miembro de la iglesia episcopal de San Pablo [St. Paul’s Episcopal Church] en Fairfield, Connecticut, ha sido banquera y como promotora, durante mucho tiempo, del empoderamiento económico de las mujeres, escribió un manual de capacitación sobre el tema, del cual cada una de las personas asistentes recibió un ejemplar.Durante la sesión de preguntas y respuestas que siguió a las presentaciones iniciales y a un ejercicio de meditación, una mujer le preguntó a Dankin lo que había querido decir antes cuando habló de cambiar a los hombres. Ella aclaró su anterior comentario diciendo que las mujeres, en la medida en que comiencen a ganar dinero y a proveer sostén a sus familias, liberan de presión a los hombres y cambian la dinámica familiar y comunitaria. En algunos casos, dijo, los hombres se han convertido en socios de las actividades empresariales de sus esposas.La Rda. Paula Nesbitt, ex presidenta del Comité sobre la Condición de la Mujer del Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal, es una investigadora académica que estudia las mujeres y el trabajo, en particular mujeres sacerdotes en las tradiciones episcopal y universalista unitaria. También ha trabajado sobre temas tales como la salud materna, la violencia contra las mujeres y la trata de personas, así como el empoderamiento, y encuentra que se necesitan tres instrumentos para la transformación: la educación, el fin de la explotación y el empoderamiento mediante grupos interconectados de mujeres.Ella recomendó que los asistentes leyeran un artículo publicado el 12 de marzo en The Economist, el cual trata acerca de la “economía feminista” y pinta un cuadro preciso de las experiencias de las mujeres a lo largo de los últimos 30 años.Otra panelista, Caroline Herewini, directora ejecutiva del Te Whare Tiaki Wahine Refuge, habló de lo que ha sido semejante para los pueblos indígenas de Nueva Zelanda, los maoríes. Antes de que Nueva Zelanda fuera descubierta por el explorador holandés Abel Tasman y cayera bajo influencias occidentales, los indígenas habían creado una sociedad sostenible,  tenían barcos de vela y habían establecido comercio con Australia; además, habían desarrollado una cultura donde “las mujeres se consideraban sagradas y los hijos erran dones de Dios”, pero al cabo de 100 años de colonización, los pueblos indígenas comenzaron a perder su cultura y su modo de vida.Antes de 1997, dijo ella, no había albergues para mujeres, específicamente para mujeres indígenas; ahora los maoríes tienen su propia red de albergues con programas para mujeres indígenas concebidos e implementados por mujeres indígenas, agregó.Ann Smith, la última de las panelistas en intervenir, habló acerca de sus 30 años de experiencia trabajando a favor del empoderamiento de las mujeres y la paridad de los sexos a nivel global, y más recientemente en el desarrollo de programas de acceso para mujeres indígenas con vistas a abordar el racismo y el sexismo institucionales interiorizados.En el desarrollo del programa, explicó ella, en lugar de crear un cronograma, crearon un círculo.“En un círculo, todo el mundo es igualmente valioso, dijo Smith.Mujeres de toda la Iglesia Episcopal y de todo el ámbito de la Comunión Anglicana, que representan a más de 20 países, se han reunido en Nueva York para asistir a la 60ª. sesión de la UNCSW del 14 al 24 de marzo.Otros artículos de ENS sobre la participación de mujeres anglicanas y episcopales en la UNCSW se encuentran aquí.— Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

Churches united in land divided by New Zealand earthquake

first_img Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Anglican Taonga] Today the first of 300 Christmas hampers will go out to earthquake-shaken families across southern Marlborough, with labels that read: “With love from the New Zealand churches.” The hampers are an idea of Seddon-based vicar, the Rev. Dawn Daunauda and lay leaders from her quake-harried parish, the Awatere Christian Joint Venture. Over the next 10 days the Awatere CJV team will deliver the hampers to households between Ward and Clarence townships, and fly others up the Awatere Valley, where roads are blocked off by slips.Full article. Featured Events Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Julanne Clarke-MorrisPosted Dec 13, 2016 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Anglican Communion Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Churches united in land divided by New Zealand earthquake Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

Builders make ‚€500,000 donation

first_img Tagged with: Ireland CIF director Joe O’Brien presented the money to Ms Kelleher on a building site near White’s Cross, north of the city, yesterday. This initiative is a milestone in the development of strong, meaningful partnerships as a means of addressing homelessness in Cork, said Ms Kelleher. Cork Simon firmly believes that we can end homelessness for good, but we cannot do it alone. This partnership with Cork CIF house builders is a perfect example of how successful that co-operation can be. Mr O’Brien said his members who signed up to the fundraising scheme fully accepted their responsibilities as members of the wider community. They understand the positive impact that organisations like Cork Simon are having on the lives of some of the most vulnerable and marginalised men and women in the city. We are delighted we reached the target of ‚€500,000 and we hope other organisations in Cork will follow our lead by identifying creative means to help tackle this important social issue. It will cost ‚€6 million to run Cork Simon’s services this year. The State provides up to two thirds but Simon must raise ‚€1.8m. Ms Kelleher said as well as securing Simon’s day-to-day services this year, the CIF donation would also allow them to expand their services. Builders make ‚€500,000 donation AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis House builders have donated ‚€500,000 to Cork Simon Community — the single biggest donation the organisation has received in its 30-year history. Cork Simon director Colette Kelleher described it as a huge, huge leg up for the agency tackling homelessness. The people who are transforming this city are now helping us to transform the lives of those we work with, she said. The money was raised by members of the Construction Industry Federation’s (CIF) Cork House Builders group. They signed up to the unique partnership with Simon 12 months ago and contributed a slice of their profits to a fund throughout the year. Advertisementcenter_img Howard Lake | 5 April 2006 | News  23 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Law Family Commission on Civil Society launches

first_imgLaw Family Commission on Civil Society launches Tagged with: Law / policy research Looking into how to unleash the potential of civil society in the 2020s, the Law Family Commission on Civil Society will be run by Pro Bono Economics with financial support from the Law Family Charitable Foundation.It will be led by 17 Commissioners drawn from the private, public and social sectors, including former politicians, philanthropists and leaders of charities, universities, businesses and community groups.These include: Dr Javed Khan, CEO of Barnardo’s; Karl Wilding, CEO of NCVO; James Timpson, CEO of Timpsons Ltd; Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson DBE, Crossbench peer, Paralympian and Chancellor of Northumbria University; and Ruth Ibegbuna, CEO Founder, RECLAIM and Director of The Roots Programme.The two-year Commission will be a research and policy project designed to focus on the past, present and future of civil society in the UK.The virtual launch is set to take place this morning, and will see former Cabinet Secretary and Commission Chair Lord Gus O’Donnell lead the discussion. He will present new research into public opinion on civil society at a time of pandemic. Conducted by Pro Bono Economics, it examines the role of charities since the arrival of Covid-19 and considers the support that civil society needs as it helps the country recover.Lord O’Donnell will be joined by keynote speakers: Oliver Dowden, Secretary of State for Digital Culture, Media and Sport, and Rachel Reeves, Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office.Panellists will include: Andy Haldane, Chief Economist of the Bank of England and founder of Pro Bono Economics; James Timpson, CEO of Timpson; Vidhya Alakeson, CEO of Power to Change; and Joel Davis, CEO of Tutors United.In addition, following the launch tomorrow, 1 December, Pro Bono Economics will also publish an essay collection – Civil Society, Unleashed – with contributions from 20 policymakers, economists, charity CEOs, business people and philanthropists including: Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester; Polly Neate, CEO of Shelter; Kajal Odedra, Executive Director, Change.org; and Andy Haldane, Chief Economist, Bank of England.  151 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Melanie May | 30 November 2020 | News About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Court refuses to try former president for Gongadze murder

first_img Ukraine escalates “information war” by banning three pro-Kremlin media Ukrainian media group harassed by broadcasting authority RSF_en News News Help by sharing this information February 26, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders roundly condemns a decision by Kiev’s Pechersky district court on 13 December to dismiss charges against former president Leonid Kuchma in connection with the murder of investigative journalist Georgiy Gongadze in 2000.In line with a ruling by the country’s highest appeal court in October (see below), the Pechersky court dismissed the case against Kuchma on the grounds that the evidence – tape recordings made secretly by his bodyguard, Mykola Melnychenko – was obtained illegally and therefore could not be used against him.“It is very regrettable that Kuchma is getting off on a legal technicality without the evidence against him being the subject of a full hearing,” Reporters Without Borders said. “This outcome leaves all the questions unanswered and does absolutely nothing to help establish the truth about Gongadze’s murder.“The investigation will not advance by sweeping aside the recordings that have always been at the centre of this case. After the many other irregularities that have marked this case from the outset, this ruling is one more reason for seriously questioning the impartiality of Ukrainian justice.”Valentyna Telichenko, the lawyer who represents Gongadze’s widow, said she would appeal against the 13 December decision. The prosecutor-general’s office is also planning to appeal, spokesman Yuri Boychenko said. Reporters Without Borders urges the courts that examine these appeals to overturn the Pechersky court’s ruling and to reinstate the Melnychenko recordings as prosecution evidence.The trial of Gen. Oleksiy Pukach, a senior intelligence officer who allegedly confessed to carry out the Gongadze murder on orders from a superior, is meanwhile continuing behind closed doors.——31.10.2011 – Clandestine recordings ruled out as evidence against ex-President KuchmaReporters Without Borders regrets that the constitutional court has taken an “irrevocabledecision” not to admit clandestine recordings of former President Leonid Kuchma as evidencethat he ordered journalist Georgy Gongadze’s murder in 2000.In a ruling on 20 October, the court rejected the recordings as evidence at the request of theUkrainian intelligence services on the grounds that they were made “illegally” by Kuchma’s thenbodyguard, Mykola Melnychenko. Kuchma, who was president from 1994 to 2005, did not knowhe was being recorded.Deputy attorney general Renat Kuzmin nonetheless said that there were other charges pendingagainst Kuchma and that the case was not closed.The prosecutor’s office began investigating Kuchma on 22 March on the basis of the recordingsprovided by Melnychenko, in which a voice that sounds like Kuchma’s can he heard saying hewanted to be rid of Gongadze.————-22.03.2011 Former president to be investigated in connection with journalist’s murderReporters Without Borders welcomes today’s announcement by the Ukrainian prosecutor’s office that it has opened a criminal investigation into the role that former President Leonid Kuchma may have played in the September 2000 murder of opposition journalist Georgiy Gongadze. It is the first time that the prosecutor’s office has decided to consider tape-recordings made by former presidential bodyguard Mykola Melnichenko as evidence. In the recordings, a voice resembling Kuchma’s can be heard referring to the need to get rid of Gongadze.Deputy prosecutor-general Renat Kuzmin announced today that Kuchma is being investigated for suspected “abuse of authority” and “illegal orders to interior ministry officials that resulted in (Gongadze’s) death.” Kuchma has been forbidden to leave the country until the investigation has been completed.“We hail the fact that a leading figure is finally being investigated in connection with this case,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Now that they are on the right road, the judicial authorities should not stop there as the names of several other senior officials have been mentioned in connection with the Melnichenko recordings. Should this investigation be taken as a sign that there is finally a real desire to shed light on Gongadze’s death? We hope so.”“But we have every reason to remain extremely cautious about a case that has seen so many contradictory developments in the past 10 years. The latest example was on 3 March, when a court upheld a decision to downgrade the definition of Gongadze’s death from ‘commissioned murder’ to a less serious one implicating only a now-dead official. Today’s announcement has not dispelled our doubts about judicial independence in this case.”Reporters Without Borders will continue to follow developments closely. It would be completely intolerable if this new investigation were to lead into another dead end, or if it were to be carried out hastily with the sole aim of absolving former senior officials. UkraineEurope – Central Asia UkraineEurope – Central Asia to go furthercenter_img Organisation Receive email alerts March 26, 2021 Find out more Crimean journalist “confesses” to spying for Ukraine on Russian TV December 14, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Court refuses to try former president for Gongadze murder Follow the news on Ukraine News News September 7, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Shannon Group drives the use of electric cars

first_imgNewsTransportShannon Group drives the use of electric carsBy Bernie English – January 21, 2018 1864 Local backlash over Aer Lingus threat Facebook Email New high-end jobs for Shannon Twitter Linkedin Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Printcenter_img Advertisement Shannon Chamber Webinar to help people cope with the stresses of COVID-19 Shannon drives the use of electric cars.COMMUTERS who drive electric cars to work and drivers with a disability in the Shannon Free Zone will see a major boost to the number of parking spaces available if a planning application from Shannon Commercial Properties is given the go-ahead.The company which manages the property assets of the Shannon Group has applied for planning permission to expand a car park in Block C of the Free Zone. A new planning application would see the overall number of car park spaces in a facility already under construction increase from 202 to 298, including 29 electrical car recharge spaces and 15 accessible spaces. Currently there are just two electric car charging spaces in Shannon. Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A spokesperson for the company said the planning application was made to cater for a growing demand as more people change to electric transport. The ESB provides some of the electric charging points in Limerick but the majority of points are currently in private ownership. More motoring news here. Is Aer Lingus taking flight from Shannon? WhatsApp TAGSelectric carsparking spacesShannonTransport Only re-integration will solve Shannon Airport crisis Previous articleA winning shot at The PeacockNext articleA hundred lives saved by Limerick river patrol Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. last_img read more

Rent Increases Spur Regulation

first_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Rent Increases Spur Regulation Related Articles June 12, 2019 743 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Previous: FHFA Talks Conservatorship and Regulation Next: Fannie Mae Surveys Market Sentiment Home / Daily Dose / Rent Increases Spur Regulation Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agocenter_img Affordability Investment Rent 2019-06-12 Seth Welborn The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: Affordability Investment Rent The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago New York state lawmakers have reached an agreement intended to strengthen New York’s rent laws and tenant protections. The New York Times reports that the deal may be a “significant blow to the real estate industry,” who have noted that these measures can lead to to the deterioration of the condition of New York City’s housing. NYT reports that the regulation would abolish rules that let building owners deregulate apartments, close a series of loopholes that permit them to raise rents and allow some tenant protections to expand.Trade groups have stated that the proposed regulations could harm smaller landlords, stating that they may not be able to raise rents due to escalating costs without going out of business.“This legislation fails to address the city’s housing crisis and will lead to disinvestment in the city’s private sector rental stock consigning hundreds of thousands of rent-regulated tenants to living in buildings that are likely to fall into disrepair,” Taxpayers for an Affordable New York, a coalition of four real estate groups said in a statement. “This legislation will not create a single new affordable housing unit, improve the vacancy rate or improve enforcement against the few dishonest landlords who tend to dominate the headlines,” the statement added. “It is now up to the governor to reject this deal in favor of responsible rent reform that protects tenants, property owners, building contractors and our communities.”Nationwide, the rental market price and demand increases, and with the additional demand, landlords are beginning to cut back on many “perks” originally intended to entice potential renters. According to Zillow, just 1 in 100 rental listings currently show any kind of move-in special, CNBC’s Diana Olick reports.Additionally, rent prices are up 3.1% year over year, to a median rent of $1,530 nationally, the highest level since August 2017.“This potentially signals more rent growth is to come, as landlords not only reduce incentives to move but also increase prices,” said Joshua Clark, economist at Zillow’s HotPads on CNBC. “Of course, all real estate is local and deals are becoming more common in some places.”  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago About Author: Seth Welborn Subscribe Sign up for DS News Daily last_img read more

Eleven US coronavirus cases range from mild to ‘extremely ill’

first_imgjarun011/iStock(ATLANTA) — Top U.S. health officials pushed back on the notion that its new travel ban against Chinese nationals and withdrawal of embassy staff was spreading fear about coronavirus at a Monday news conference.“This is an aggressive action by the United States, but our goal is to slow this thing down,” said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.Messonnier’s response came hours after Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying called the United States’ actions “excessive” and said that such measures “could only create and spread fear.”“This is an unprecedented situation,” Messonnier said of the novel coronavirus outbreak.She cited the outbreak’s rapid expansion, lack of population immunity to the new virus, person-to-person and community transmission in China, and concerning data about possible asymptomatic disease transmission as factors that went into health officials’ decision-making process.“All of those are worrisome data points,” Messonnier added.U.S. coronavirus patients’ illnesses range from mild to severeThe U.S. currently has 11 patients who have tested positive for the new coronavirus and 167 patients who have tested negative. Eighty-two tests are still pending, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Of those cases, nine are travel-related and two involved human-to-human transmission between close contacts — in each instance, the transmission was between a husband and wife.According to Messonnier, the U.S. coronavirus cases have been along a spectrum of severity. Some of the cases have been mild. Other patients have had moments when they were “extremely ill” and required oxygen to breath. Data out of China suggests that people who are older, or who have underlying health problems, are at higher risk for severe forms of coronavirus.No deaths have been reported in the United States.The coronavirus outbreak has now infected nearly 17,500 people globally and has killed at least 361 of them, almost all in China.Beyond China, at least 169 cases have been confirmed in 25 countries.The vast majority of cases of the novel coronavirus have been reported in mainland China, with the epicenter still in Wuhan, a city of 11 million and the capital of central Hubei province, where the first cases were detected back in December. A total of 17,205 people have been infected with the disease and 361 have since died, according to the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China.In the first case of death outside China, a man in the Philippines died after contracting the coronavirus from his friend while they were traveling together in Wuhan, China, according to the Philippines Department of Health.Hong Kong expands border closuresHong Kong leader Carrie Lam on Monday announced additional border closures, severing all but three links between the semi-autonomous Chinese city and mainland China. The Hong Kong International Airp[ort, the Shenzhen Bay border and the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge remain open.The move came as thousands of public hospital workers went on strike Monday morning, demanding the Hong Kong government shutter all borders with mainland China as the country struggles to contain the outbreak. At least 15 people in the city have been infected with the novel coronavirus, according to the Hong Kong Department of Health.U.S. declares emergency and travel banThe U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar has declared a public health emergency and a temporary travel ban.Over the weekend, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced that flights entering the country from China will be rerouted — at no additional cost to the passenger — to seven airports designated for screenings.The new coronovirus causes symptoms similar to pneumonia that can range from mild, such as a slight cough, to more severe, including fever and difficulty breathing, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Expert warns of ‘Coronavirus Carmaggedon’ if returning workers avoid mass transit

first_imgBim/iStockBy GIO BENITEZ and MINA KAJI, ABC News(NEW YORK) — As states start to ease restrictions, the man who coined the term “gridlock” is warning that drivers could face an unprecedented level of traffic if people avoid mass transit due to COVID-19 concerns.“You’re gonna have people in cars that were previous transit users,” Sam Schwartz, traffic consultant and former New York City traffic commissioner, told ABC News. “It could be 10, 20, 30% higher than what we’ve seen. Traffic could come to a standstill.”Schwartz says that the rush-hour commute in some cities could triple in length — a two-hour period could become a four- to six-hour ordeal.“Let’s say it’s from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. or 7 a.m. to 9 a.m.,” Schwartz said. “It may now be from 6 a.m. to 11 a.m.”Schwartz believes cities will be forced to implement a number of strategies to combat the increase in road traffic such as staggered work hours.In New York City, subway ridership is currently down over 80% compared to last year, according to the MTA.Schwartz said traffic data from the Long Island Expressway shows that cars are traveling faster than 50 miles per hour, but by Labor Day, he believes every inch of it could be packed with slow-moving traffic.Nationally, traffic has risen to 88% below pre-COVID levels, with a low of 52% during the first week of April, according to traffic analytics company INRIX.This might increase even further in the summer, according to a new survey commissioned by the Out of Home Advertising Association of America (OAAA), which showed that 62% of summer vacationers are planning to travel by car — an increase of 72% from last year.“This survey confirms what we’ve all suspected — that consumers around the country are eager to get out of their homes in a safe way and travel this summer, primarily via the sanctuary of the car,” OAAA President and CEO Anna Bager said in a release. “With restrictions easing, people are craving the open road especially to see family and friends.”Experts expect this to translate to an increase in car sales.Jessica Caldwell, executive director of insights at Edmunds, explained that she keeps hearing from car buyers that they “are just a bit cautious about not only mass transit, but also just transporting themselves to go to Costco, to go to the grocery store.”The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends people who choose to take mass transit wear a cloth face covering, practice social distancing, good hand hygiene and avoid touching surfaces.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more